Engineering physics: Which specialization? Bio-phys vs applied-phys

  • #1
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Hi! The time has come to choose the specialization of my EP degree, and for this occasion I hope it's OK to make a very self-centred thread :p. Here's what I study: http://www.ntnu.edu/studies/mtfyma. The 3 choices are: math, applied physics and biophysics.

I don't think I want to specialize in mathematics (even though I find it much easier than physics), but rather some form of phyiscs. So I guess it's between biology or more technical stuff.

Under both biophysics and applied physics I can choose pretty much any concentration I want, but my problem is that I have very little knowledge of upper-level physics or what it's like. I am frankly overwhelmed by the options and unable to make a decision. So could you guys help me choose what I should specialize in?

Stuff I enjoy/am interested in:

* Technology. I have always been fascinated by the technological progress of humanity, and so this is definitely something I want to be a part of.

* Space exploration. A very interesting field - very adventurous and fascinating. I enjoy the novelty of exploration.

* How the brain works. I've always wanted to know more about it, and would be interested to see if it's possible to amplify its workings.

* Evolution. I've always found it very interesting and fundamental, and think it's cool how it can be used to optimize processes in computer science.

* Cutting-edge technology. I like ambitious goals and unexplored territory.

* Working internationally. Anywhere else than Norway.

My school is (probably) comparable to caltech or similarly strict US engineering schools when it comes to difficulty and workload, and I aim at a decent GPA (at least 3.5) when I graduate.

1) Does this mean I can get onto a graduate program in the USA in one of the fields above?
2) Is a graduate program important or more trouble than its worth if I want to develop technology?
3) How about employment? Is biophysics risky in this regard?
4) What other relevant cutting edge fields are there than the ones I listed?

Thanks for any reply :)
 
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Answers and Replies

  • #2
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Unless you are certain about biophysics, I would choose applied physics because it is less restrictive. It will allow you more freedom to explore your options.
 
  • #3
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How is it restricted? And what would my options be with biophysics?

How is the employment situation? The last thing I would want is end up as a hospital engineer or something..
 
  • #4
esuna
Gold Member
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It looks like that is a master's program, correct? With a master's in Bio-physics, usually the purpose is to begin a 2-3 year residency at a hospital in order to be qualified to work in the oncology department of a hospital. At least, that is mostly what I have seen when I have researched biomedical physics. It doesn't seem like a bad way to go, if you would like that.
 
  • #5
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Does anybody know about nanotechnology?

Is the field good for employment and are there many opportunities? Is it hard to get in?
 
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