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Estimating Henrys Law constant C02

  1. Nov 14, 2011 #1
    I was given the table below all i want to do is estimate the Henry's constant at -10 and 60 degrees. Just wondering the best way to go about this.

    Would it be to take the log of the graph and add a treadline?

    HENRY’S LAW CONSTANT FOR CO2

    TEMPERATURE (0C)
    HENRY’S LAW CONSTANT (Kh/10,000, atm)​
    0
    0.073​
    10
    0.104​
    20
    0.142​
    30
    0.186​
    40
    0.233


    Cheers.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 14, 2011 #2

    rude man

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    Homework Helper
    Gold Member

    You should fit your data to theory:

    k(T) = k(T0)exp(-k1/T + k2)

    where k(T0) ~ 0.142
    k1 ~ 2400 for CO2
    k2 ~ k1/T0

    I would set k1 and k2 to the above values exactly and then fit the data for k(T0) only, but maybe that would probably be cheating.
     
  4. Nov 15, 2011 #3
    I think i have to do the log of the graph then use quadratics and polynomials to compare and conclude. Does anyone know how i can use polynomial treadlined graphs to calculate the henry's constant which is in the x axis.
     
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