Factorise p(x) as a product of linear factors

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  • #2
jbunniii
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  • #3
Can you start by stating the rational root theorem, and what it says about the possible rational roots of the polynomial?
ok! i will try that. :smile:
 
  • #4
After you find one root, I would use synthetic division to find the others.

But I guess it this case you really don't have to.
 
  • #6
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The scan of your work is illegible. It appears that you did your work on graph paper, and possibly in pencil, making what you wrote very difficult to read.
 
  • #7
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Here is it finished, could somebody prof-read it and comment? tell if theres some improvements to be done. ;-)
http://img33.imageshack.us/img33/72/opgave3.th.jpg [Broken]
Guesswork is a good thing in mathematics, but guesswork often need some kind of reasoning. Drawing a graph by hand / on computer is not guesswork in this case. You should come up with a more sophisticated way of showing what your guesswork builds on.

One way to go by, is to look at the last number in the polynom, and factorize that number, finding numbers that constitute 56. You would then get some of the roots you have come up with doing your "guesswork". After that, do polynom division. Or two.
 
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