1. Not finding help here? Sign up for a free 30min tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Force on pins holding cables

  1. Jan 31, 2010 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data

    A precast concrete wall is temporarily kept in its vertical position by ropes. Find the total force exerted on the pin at position A. The tensions in AB and AC are 420 lbs and 650 lbs.

    3. The attempt at a solution

    I'm not sure where to start, because I don't know whether or not the tension from DB to DC also counts towards the force on the pin at A. I am also not sure on what values to add. Like if I add vectors AB and AC, is the result at the same angle?
     

    Attached Files:

  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 31, 2010 #2

    tiny-tim

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    Hi warfreak131! :smile:

    There's no force-at-a-distance … the only forces at A are the forces at A. :wink:
    You add the force vectors, not the position vectors.

    (All the angles are either equal or opposite, so yes you could take a short-cut for each component separately … but I wouldn't recommend it.)
     
  4. Jan 31, 2010 #3
    ok, but DC, and DB are pulling on the wall too, so wouldn't that put extra tension in the cables AB and AC and cause the pin to experience a greater force?
     
  5. Jan 31, 2010 #4

    tiny-tim

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    ah, but that's taken account of in the question
    … it may well put extra tension in AB and AC, but you've been given figures that include that! :wink:
     
  6. Jan 31, 2010 #5
    very true sir.... very true,

    so should i just find the angles that the cables make with the fore and background edges, and then add the force vectors?
     
  7. Jan 31, 2010 #6

    tiny-tim

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    Yes, except that you don't actually need to find the angles, you can get the cosines just by using the coordinates, and dividing by the hypotenuse. :wink:
     
  8. Jan 31, 2010 #7
    ok, thanks a bunch
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook




Similar Discussions: Force on pins holding cables
Loading...