Fourier Intergrals and transforms

  • Thread starter Brewer
  • Start date
  • #1
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How do I do a Fourier integral (and whats the point of them??)

I've been asked to evaluate

[tex]F(\omega) = \frac{1}{\sqrt{2\pi}}\int dte^{-\alpha t}cos\omega t[/tex]

and I've not the foggiest idea what to do. I thought I could just go about doing in the integral by parts (limits are 0 and infinity by the way), but on further research I don't think I can do that can I?
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
1,074
1
Try integration by parts.
 
  • #3
mathman
Science Advisor
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cos(u)=(exp(iu)+exp(-iu))/2

Substitute into your integral and you will have the sum of two exp integrals. I presume you can do that.
 
  • #4
212
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Yes thats familliar. I have done this integral before - just never dawned on me to use the substitution.

I was also a little confused when it called it a Fourier Integral. I thought it was going to be a lot more complex than it appears to be now.
 

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