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Fourier transform

  1. Apr 4, 2007 #1
    how can I find fourier transform of 1/(1+4t^2)?
    hmmm =/
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 4, 2007 #2
    try to take x=2t and use the symmetry or duality property and then the scaling property
     
  4. Apr 4, 2007 #3
    Use the fact that your expression can be expressed as [tex]\int{\frac{f(t)}{g(t)}dx}[/tex], where [tex]f(t) = e^{-j\omega t}, g(t)=1+4t^{2}[/tex] and proceed as stated by the rule. If i remember it correctly it goes something like [tex]\frac{f'(t)g(t)-g'(t)f(t)}{g(t)^{2}}[/tex]
     
    Last edited: Apr 4, 2007
  5. Apr 4, 2007 #4
    You've mixed up differentiation and integration...
     
  6. Apr 4, 2007 #5
    manchot is right ... so complicated ... i think the properties of the fourier transformation is better
     
  7. Apr 4, 2007 #6
    damn.... you're right ;)
     
  8. Apr 4, 2007 #7
    i tried taking a look at the fourier transform properties..
    but hmm, still confused
     
  9. Apr 5, 2007 #8
    check the scaling and the symmetry property ... sorry i can't tell the answer ... it is the rules ...
     
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