General relativity and scale

In summary, Einstein's remainder encodes a universal energy background as mass, in terms of a limit for this energy in discrete terms; the limit represents a bound for the other two components, the e and u that modulate spacetime M; time is then generated by a linear transform of these components as a binary wave, in spacetime.
  • #1
sirchasm
95
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Einstein's remainder encodes (= formulates) a universal energy background as mass, in terms of a limit for this energy in discrete terms; the limit represents a bound for the other two components, the e and u that modulate spacetime M; time is then generated by a linear transform of these components as a binary wave, in spacetime.

(first up, is E=mc^2 a remainder? It's certainly invariant)

Is the remainder a one-way function? Can the structure of the universal spacetime be recovered from a universal mass term and universal energy? Can a transform be built that is Turing-complete?
We know the transforms we use might be universal, but when we encode the physical constants that appear to be the limits of our local frame = (G,h,c), the results don't connect to the apparent distant limits when we use the same constants, so we see a lot more energy in this large space than there should be (apparently).

(what does Turing-complete mean in this context)
 
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  • #2
I think it has to do with another e, not charge but exponentiation of charge.
Because e is a series and an integral (it has a geometry too), it encapsulates enumeration, sum and product and curvature, it's a complete yet infinitely-scaled value, of numbers, or a number.

That is, e is gauged ( = measured, calculated) by 1 and infinity.

c, the special velocity of light is too; since the m in [tex] E=mc^2\, [/tex] is too, or is at least molar, it doesn't inform the low end except exp doesn't ever vanish. The GR scale is: "to molarity and beyond"
 
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  • #3
So we don't see, generally, anything unless it's made out of a lot of atoms, or an atom 'emits' something a lot of times (over a small time).
This is the molar gauge, which we might envisage as a point of intersection, which can't be "the point = e", since e counts, both atoms and single atom 'events', it defines a series, and the sum of a series (it's a countable infinity)

When we do use 'single' atoms and control their 'positions' with electric fields and their internal spin-energies with magnetic fields, they vanish from what we call a thermodynamic state and 'resonate' in place together, they self-assemble or condense in a strictly non-Avogadrian way,

Avogadro has to take his number and leave the room for a while.
 

1. What is General Relativity?

General Relativity is a theory of gravity proposed by Albert Einstein in the early 20th century. It explains how the force of gravity arises from the curvature of space and time caused by massive objects.

2. How does General Relativity explain the concept of scale?

General Relativity explains that the scale of objects, such as planets, stars, and galaxies, affects the curvature of space and time around them. This curvature then determines the motion of other objects in their vicinity.

3. Can General Relativity be applied to both small and large scales?

Yes, General Relativity can be applied to both small and large scales. It has been tested and proven to accurately describe the motion of objects from subatomic particles to entire galaxies.

4. How does General Relativity differ from Newton's theory of gravity?

Newton's theory of gravity is based on the concept of a force acting between two objects, while General Relativity explains gravity as the curvature of space and time caused by the presence of mass and energy.

5. What are some real-world applications of General Relativity?

General Relativity has many practical applications, including the accurate prediction of the orbits of planets, the functioning of GPS systems, and the detection of gravitational waves. It also plays a crucial role in our understanding of the universe and the behavior of black holes.

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