Global Temperature Rising: Troposphere & Water Vapor

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In summary, the conversation discusses the relationship between global temperature rise and water vapor in the troposphere, as well as the potential negative feedback effect of water vapor on global warming. The concept of climate belts shifting and the impact on tropical areas is also mentioned. Ultimately, the conversation suggests that the effects of increased greenhouse gas concentrations on global climate are complex and unpredictable.
  • #1
Soaring Crane
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If global temperature(s) continues to rise, does that mean that the troposphere will contain more water vapor?
 
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  • #2
The big debate about water vapor is this versus http://www.climate2003.com/blog/arking.htm

You can also see it in this quick and dirty way:
If the Earth heats up more due to the enhanced greenhouse forcing then this heating will be strongest in the lower atmosphere, where most greenhouse gas is and it's closest to the source, the infrared radiating heat.

Too bad for the global warmers that this heat is not showing in the radio sondes temperature registration that measure exactly that area of the atmosphere, but anyway.

So if more infra red radiation is captured directly in the lower atrmosphere, the higher part of the atmosphere receives less IR radiation that the greenhouse gasses can capture and heat the air with. The cooling is actually occurring but no-one knows exactly why. Cooler upper air means less water vapor in the air and more condensation - hence clouds. Furthermore a higher vertical temperature gradient in the atmosphere means unstable conditions, convection and even more clouds forming. More clouds is probably having a negative feedback effect, more incoming solar radiation is reflected and there is less solar energy to capture with the greenhouse gas effect. So water vapor may have a negative feedback although it is the strongest greenhouse gas.

Are there examples of that negative feedback?

Perhaps. Try the paleao glacial confusion thread. We see two very wet era's (the Bolling Allerod and the Preboreal) with simulatenous massive glacier growing. Hence not that much warming despite the very moist conditions.
 
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  • #3
Oh, another question. From global warming, climate belts could shift northward by about 100 km in altitude for each increase in degree of temp. Does this mean tropical areas will become cooler than they are now?
 
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  • #4
Anyone?

Thanks.
 
  • #5
Interesting question. The heating of the Earth causes Hadley cells and those govern the climate zones.
http://www.newmediastudio.org/DataDiscovery/Hurr_ED_Center/Easterly_Waves/Trade_Winds/Trade_Winds.html

In the hypothetical case that increased greenhouse gas concentrations would greatly increase the warming due to absorption of reradiated IR energy, it could be argued that the downdraft areas, the arid climates would heat more than the updraft areas (the moist climates). That unbalance could destroy the circulation of the hadley cells and have very unpredictable impact on the global climate. It would be more complicated than a simple shift of climate belts.
 
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Related to Global Temperature Rising: Troposphere & Water Vapor

1. What is the relationship between global temperature and troposphere?

The troposphere is the lowest layer of the Earth's atmosphere, and it is where most of the Earth's weather occurs. The temperature in this layer generally decreases as altitude increases. However, as global temperatures rise, the troposphere also warms up. This is because the Earth's surface is heated by the sun and then radiates that heat into the atmosphere, causing the temperature to increase in the troposphere.

2. How does water vapor contribute to global temperature rising?

Water vapor is the most abundant greenhouse gas in the Earth's atmosphere. It acts as a natural insulator, trapping heat and preventing it from escaping into space. As global temperatures rise, the amount of water vapor in the atmosphere also increases, creating a positive feedback loop. This means that as the Earth warms, more water vapor is present, which further warms the Earth.

3. What evidence supports the idea of global temperature rising due to troposphere and water vapor?

There is significant scientific evidence that supports the idea of global temperature rising due to the troposphere and water vapor. This includes data from satellites, weather balloons, and surface temperature measurements. These measurements have shown a consistent increase in global temperature over the past century, which is strongly correlated with the increase in atmospheric water vapor.

4. How does human activity contribute to the increase in global temperature?

Human activities, such as burning fossil fuels and deforestation, release large amounts of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. These gases, such as carbon dioxide and methane, trap heat and contribute to the warming of the Earth's surface. This is known as the greenhouse effect. The increase in global temperature is primarily caused by human activities that release these greenhouse gases.

5. What are the potential consequences of continued global temperature rising?

The consequences of continued global temperature rising are numerous and severe. They include more frequent and intense heat waves, increased frequency and severity of natural disasters, rising sea levels, changes in precipitation patterns, and negative impacts on ecosystems and biodiversity. It is crucial that we take action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and mitigate the effects of global temperature rising to avoid these consequences.

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