Going into Medical Physics (UK)

  • Thread starter neu
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  • #1
neu
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I've just got a 2:1 MSci in Physics and I weighing up my options. I'm seriously considering going into Medical physics for various reasons; although I've only done one medical physics module in my course. I've looked into it and I'd obviously have to do an additional training on a programme accredited by the IPEM (and maybe an MSc/PhD). I was wondering if anyone had any insight into the world of a medical physicist in the NHS or possibly other career paths.

The whole things a bit of a pipe dream at the moment, as my circumstances have changed very quickly, and I've only really considered this option recently, hence my ignorace.
 

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  • #2
Choppy
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Out of curiosity, what does 2:1 mean?

Generally to work as a medical physicist the minimum education you'll need is an M.Sc. Jobs available to those with a bachelor's degree are usually at the level of physics assistant which involve a lot of routine QA duties.

Medical physics offers great career potential in my opinion as there's a decent balance between clinical duties (which translates into stable, well-paying jobs) and research. The road however is a long one.
 
  • #3
neu
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A 2:1 is an upper second class degree.
>70% = 1
60-69% = 2.1
50-59% = 2.2
40-49% = 3rd

Is it different in the US? I thought it was the same.
 
  • #4
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A 2:1 is an upper second class degree.
>70% = 1
60-69% = 2.1
50-59% = 2.2
40-49% = 3rd

Is it different in the US? I thought it was the same.
Nope. Different system. I'm not even sure the theoretical grades are equivalent.

We go on a (usually) four point GPA system. 2.0 (C = 70%) is "average", 3.0 (B = 80%) is "above average", 4.0 (A=90%) is "significantly above average".

We (U.S.) are fighting with grade inflation here, where some schools or individual teachers give way more A/B grades than is justified by student performance. Some of us actually monitor our class statistics and try to give appropriate A/B/C/D/F grades. I'm one of the ones that monitors carefully.
 
  • #5
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Are the grades curved?
 
  • #6
189
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In the US? Depends on the teacher/instructor. Sometimes yes, sometimes no. And what kind of curve and how it is applied can vary.
 

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