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Good Sci Fi books

  1. Jul 2, 2006 #1
    I'm looking for any good Sci Fi books to read in my summer vacation. Here are a few suggestions for books for anyone else:

    Ben Bova (benbova.com) is a good authoer whose books seem really good. I would reccommend (I cant spell) Powersat to start off with though and then the other books.

    Kip Robinson is also good a good author who wrote Red Mars, Green Mars and Blue Mars. I'm about to start Green Mars.

    Please post your suggestions below.
     
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  3. Jul 2, 2006 #2
    Anything by Robert Heinlein is good. He's always been one of my favourite SF authors.
     
  4. Jul 3, 2006 #3

    J77

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    Alastair Reynolds is good, imo.
     
  5. Jul 3, 2006 #4
    Best new sci-fi I have read is the books by Alastair Reynolds. Brilliant!

    You cant go wrong with anything by peter hamilton and Stephen baxter either. Pic upp Hamiltons Nights Dawn triology and you got some reading to do, each book is well over 1000 pages. I prefer his 2 comonwealth books though.

    You cant possibly go wrong with Asimov either.
     
  6. Jul 3, 2006 #5
    This Perfect Day, by Ira Levin.
     
  7. Jul 3, 2006 #6
    who has best followed his type
    I like brin and niven and brunner
    who do you guys like

    gibson and Neal Stephenson for computer based si-fi
     
  8. Jul 3, 2006 #7
    In the last 2 weeks I've read 3 sci fi books: Jurassic Park, The Lost World and Timeline. The three of them by Michael Crichton, and very entertaining indeed. Timeline is very recommendable, because it can also appeal to history buffs. Yes, is about time travel, and the characters travel to the fourteenth century, when there's a lot of battles and suspense and gore. The means to achieve time travel is questionable: in the book, the "many worlds" theory of Quantum Mechanics is found to be correct, so in theory there exists a multiverse formed by the zillion of worlds that have sprouted from the many events occurred during the history of the Universe. The book hypothesizes that you can travel to any of these universes, and some of these are still experiencing our past.
     
    Last edited: Jul 3, 2006
  9. Jul 3, 2006 #8

    Danger

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    I recommend anything by Larry Niven, but most specifically the Ringworld series (Ringworld, The Ringworld Engineers, The Ringworld Throne, and Ringworld's Children). You'll be amazed at the engineering concepts he came up with. Also James P. Hogan's stuff is all great.
     
  10. Jul 3, 2006 #9

    Evo

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    I grew up on the classics, Isaac Asimov, Arthur C Clarke, Ray Bradbury, Poul Anderson. If you haven't read works by these authors, make the time to do so. Of course Heinlein was great. Asimov's Dr Urth stories were always a favorite.

    I agree Neal Stephenson's Snow Crash is a great book on cyberspace fiction, but I think MadScientist 1000 is a bit too young for it. I would say parts of it are definitely rated "R", but perhaps I'm just a prude. Ok, thinking back on parts of it, I'm not a prude. :blushing:

    Asimov has to take credit in my early interests in physics and space travel. Stories like "Marooned off Vesta" - Marooned Off Vesta tells the story of three men who survive the wreck of the spaceship Silver Queen in the asteroid belt and find themselves trapped in orbit around the asteroid Vesta. They have at their disposal three airtight rooms, one spacesuit, three days' worth of air, a week's supply of food, and a year's supply of water. With typically Asimovian courage and ingenuity, the trapped men manage to use the limited resources at their disposal to rescue themselves. The description of their rescue is heavy with accurate portrayals of the physics and experiences involved with being in space, a theme that often re-emerges in Asimov's later works.

    His 4 Dr Urth stories, "The Key, using "platinum black" as a catalyst, I will always remember
     
    Last edited: Jul 3, 2006
  11. Jul 3, 2006 #10

    selfAdjoint

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    The late Poul Anderson had a long career writing wonderful sf and fantasy books. His characters were always gripping aand his backgrounds fascinating. Try Tau zero, a dramatization of the Lorentz Transforms, better than L. Ron Hubbard's take in To the Stars, though that's no slouch and good to see it back in print.

    I'd also like to recommend C.J. Cherryh. Her Chanur series is swell for young people and her "Downbelow Station" universe holds a lot of stories, from romantic adventure to military sf to gritty "slice of life in a spaceship" stories. Her latest series, The "Foreigner" books is currently on the third triad of who knows how many it will eventually run? Unlike the famed 'Dune" series of Frank Herbert, it gets stronger rather than weaker as it goes along.

    Oh, and speaking of series, what about Gene Wolfe and his three series, the "New Urth", "Long Sun" and "Short Sun" books.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 3, 2006
  12. Jul 3, 2006 #11

    Evo

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    oooh, I know where I'm going . I need books to read in bed with the air conditioner on.

    I used to own this book. :cry: "Asimov's Mysteries" http://www.answers.com/topic/asimov-s-mysteries
     
    Last edited: Jul 3, 2006
  13. Jul 3, 2006 #12

    Evo

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  14. Jul 4, 2006 #13

    J77

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    I also enjoyed Fallen Dragon by Peter F Hamilton.

    He has a large number of very large books :tongue: However, I think they follow each other so I haven't got round to beginning at the beginning yet :wink: :biggrin:
     
  15. Jul 4, 2006 #14

    arildno

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    1. I wouldn't recommend Asimov as literature (he's more of an essayist/philosopher), but Bradbury certainly is that (he's brilliant, IMO).

    2. Peter Hamilton is great.

    3. Philip K. Dick is a wacky version of Asimov, quite interesting though.

    4. If you can stand Heinlein's fasisctoid flirtings, go ahead. Ignore Simak (hate that guy)

    5. And, just about anything by Sir Clarke is fantastic.
     
  16. Jul 4, 2006 #15
    Dont forget the heechee books by Pohl, they are fantastic.
     
  17. Jul 4, 2006 #16

    selfAdjoint

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    Interesting pair of opinions. Usually people who hate Heinlein for "fascism" like Simak the gentle populist.
     
  18. Jul 4, 2006 #17

    arildno

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    Hmm..I just rambled down the names of two guys. It wasn't meant to insinuate that Simak had any fascist or otherwise unpalatable opinions.
    "Hate" was a bit too strong a word, what I meant, was that I don't think his stories are any good at all.
     
  19. Aug 22, 2009 #18
    Diaspora -- Greg Egan
    Cats Cradle -- Kurt Vonnegut (old but still great)
    nClone -- Dovin Melhee
     
  20. Oct 28, 2009 #19
  21. Oct 30, 2009 #20

    Dembadon

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    In my opinion, you can't really go wrong with Isaac Asimov's "Foundation Series".
     
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