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GRE for Ivy League?

  1. Mar 12, 2005 #1
    This question may seem a little premature, since I'm only an undergrad, but what should GRE scores be if I want to get into Cornell or some other Ivy league school? I don't know if this has any impact, but if I was accepted I intend to pursue a master's in mathematics.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 12, 2005 #2
    I always try to do the best I can.
     
  4. Mar 13, 2005 #3

    Astronuc

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    Staff: Mentor

    As mmapcpro indicated, just do your best. Get as high a score as possible, which hopefully reflects that you are a competent and knowledgable student and not just a great at taking tests.
     
  5. Mar 13, 2005 #4

    SpaceTiger

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    Staff Emeritus
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    Gold Member

    It depends on the program you're applying to. I was applying to Physics, so they (all of the schools, ivy or not) were much more concerned about my Physics GRE score than the regular GRE. For the regular, they wanted a high math score (if you don't get nearly all of the math problems right, you shouldn't be in physics) and competent scores on the other sections.

    You should remember two things, however. First, graduate school is not quite like undergrad, so a school's prestige will not be anywhere near universal across all disciplines. Don't aim to get into ivy league schools just because of what they are, ask your professors about their reputation and just apply to the best schools in your field (if you think you can get in). The other thing to remember is that graduate school is meant to focus on a single discipline. For maximum success in graduate school admission, you shouldn't be looking to distinguish yourself as an "overall good student" as you did in high school. Rather, you should be looking for specific ins within your field of interest. If possible, start on research early and get to know the professors at your undergraduate institution. Graduate schools look very kindly upon published undergrads.
     
  6. Mar 13, 2005 #5
    Average GRE for Cornell in 2003 was 1350.

    Just look on the whatever university's website to find out.
     
  7. Mar 14, 2005 #6
    Hey those are some great points! I'm so used to thinking about competition as an undergrad. I may try to do all of my graduate stuff at the same college that I'm at, Binghamton University. They have a very rigorous math department and offer TA's to anyone pursing a master's in arts.
     
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