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Programs Has anyone ever taken ME+Philosophy double major for Bachelor's degree?

104
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Philosophy+Mathematics or Physics will definetly bring a synergistic effect, however,
how about mechanical engineering and philosophy?
has anyone taken this combination?
 
324
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No.. Why would you? Philosophy is completely different from math and physics. Ok well not completely but only take philosophy if you're actually interested.
 
104
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ME will get me a job and philosophy will satisfy my intellectual desire. I will absolutely take philosophy if I were to go far mathematics or physics, but I am not sure if applied mathematics and physicis are relevant to philosophy
 
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Um if you want intellectual desire, do mathematics. DONE. If you're interested in philosophy i guess you can do it. Actually no. I'm not the boss of you. You're a human being who has choices. If you really want to take philosophy go for it. Take courses and see how it is. If you don't like it, well you don't like it.
 
104
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I was just wondering if these kinds of unusual combination work. For exmaple, I have seen few people taking Physics+Ecnomics double degree
 

PhanthomJay

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I haven't, but i work with someone who got a Degree in Philosophy and then went on to get a EE degree....a bit unusual, but he is a great engineer.
 
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Oxford have a 'with Philosophy' program for Physics and if memory serves me right, I believe they have one for Mathematics as well. There.
 
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Oxford have a 'with Philosophy' program for Physics and if memory serves me right, I believe they have one for Mathematics as well. There.
yeah the do have both courses. Same of University of Toronto. But I am not sure if engineering with philosophy would work?
 
I'm getting a dual degree in physics and philosophy. Can't speak for mechanical engineering, but the combination I have is pretty interesting. Very different in terms of the work you will be doing (ie philosophy is all reading and writing, whereas physics is working problems and whatnot). Both are very analytical (well, depending on the philosophy program you go into - ours is), but it's not like there's much overlap in subject matter - though they're both asking about the 'big questions' so to speak, they go about that in very different ways. Personally, I rather enjoy the contrast, but you have to enjoy reading and writing to enjoy philosophy. Mechanical engineering, huh? Can't speak for that as a major, but physics, in my mind, is at the top of the heap. So, if you can handle it, I say you can't do any better than physics. So, of course I recommend physics over an 'engineering' degree. :p
 
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I'm getting a dual degree in physics and philosophy. Can't speak for mechanical engineering, but the combination I have is pretty interesting. Very different in terms of the work you will be doing (ie philosophy is all reading and writing, whereas physics is working problems and whatnot). Both are very analytical (well, depending on the philosophy program you go into - ours is), but it's not like there's much overlap in subject matter - though they're both asking about the 'big questions' so to speak, they go about that in very different ways. Personally, I rather enjoy the contrast, but you have to enjoy reading and writing to enjoy philosophy. Mechanical engineering, huh? Can't speak for that as a major, but physics, in my mind, is at the top of the heap. So, if you can handle it, I say you can't do any better than physics. So, of course I recommend physics over an 'engineering' degree. :p
but what about financial matters? apart from the amount of salaries, engineers can easily get a job, because the demand is high right? how about physicists?
 
but what about financial matters? apart from the amount of salaries, engineers can easily get a job, because the demand is high right? how about physicists?
Well, I'd say you can do more with a degree in physics, even if you don't go into graduate school. A lot of graduates from physics go on to Med School, or Law, or something else; it looks good as a degree. If you want to go into physics as a career, you can do quite well financially, depending on what exactly you want to do. I think engineers tend to make more money right out of the gate, but ultimately a PhD in physics will earn you more. If you go into academia, you can do pretty well, but it may take awhile to get full professor, and until then you won't be making a killing. Industry is where the money is, especially in fields like solid state (vs. say, astronomy). If you work for the government you can make good money as well, plus they have great benefits. There's always a demand for physics majors, I think the only issue might be funding of your research, but that depends on what field you go into. The point is, I don't see any reason why you would struggle to find a job with a degree in physics, even if you don't want to continue on to get a PhD (tho, if you want to do physics, that is a must). I don't profess to be an expert of any kind on this matter, so take all that with a grain of salt. That's how I think it all works out, tho.
 
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how about mathematics?
 

turbo

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I started in Engineering with a concentration in Chemical Engineering, thinking to work in pulp and paper. Then, I swerved to Liberal Arts and took a double-major in English literature and philosophy. I left college to earn more money and ended up working as a materials scientist, and eventually went to put in 10 years in a new pulp and paper mill, and many years afterward as a consultant to pulp and paper mills all over. If I hadn't developed severe reactions to fragrance chemicals (which forced me to stop flying altogether), I'd still be consulting/troubleshooting. It was pretty sweet. I had some pretty open-ended deals with mills in GA, AL, MD, KY, and lots of short-term gigs with others in FL, MS, TX. Still, no degree in either field. Just all kinds of relevant work-experience and a track record.

My point is that there is nothing about engineering and liberal arts that precludes success in either field in your career. Your experience in the work-force will probably not mirror your college experience, and you should expect to be flexible.

Let's keep in mind that studying "philosophy" in years gone by meant that you were learning what there was to know about all kinds of things, not just pondering the meaning of life or studying comparative theological lit. Scientists a few centuries ago were not only scientists as we perceive them to be now. They also knew biblical studies, theologies, Latin, Greek, math, geometry, and classical literature from centuries preceding themselves. (And a lot more!)
 
Financially, I think math is a little lower than physics. In terms of your success in finding a job, I don't think you'll have a problem with either. Here's a site I found that lists some of the average salaries for a bunch of different professions, if that is what you are interested in.

http://www.bls.gov/oco/oco1002.htm

Also, turbo-1 makes a good point about philosophy of the past. In Greek, philosopher means 'lover of wisdom,' and what we now call the sciences were once natural philosophy.
I'd say go with whatever interests you. You'll be fine in any of those fields (assuming you're ok with teaching at a university if you go math or philosophy, since that's the main option available there).
 
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