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History of ferrous metallurgy

  1. Mar 12, 2009 #1
    I want to talk about metallurgy on here. I'm studying the history of ferrous metallurgy, and know some simple forms of steel, but I want to know everything I can learn before I go, if I go, into college. Someone help me out. If not, TY anyways.:smile:
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 12, 2009 #2

    Borek

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    Re: Metallurgy

    If you will know everything, will it still make sense to go to the college?
     
  4. Mar 12, 2009 #3

    symbolipoint

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    Re: Metallurgy

    Do you believe you can prepare enough before going to college? Attend a community college which has a materials technology program or a Metallurgy program. A metallurgical program may give you enough of the preparation that you want.
     
  5. Mar 12, 2009 #4
    Re: Metallurgy

    Well, can I take it, while being so young?
     
  6. Mar 12, 2009 #5

    Borek

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    Re: Metallurgy

    Problem is not in the age, but whether you know enough to understand more advanced ideas. Doesn't make sense to discuss phase diagram of carbon/iron alloys:

    http://www.substech.com/dokuwiki/doku.php?id=iron-carbon_phase_diagram

    if you have no idea what phase is. As of now could be you will spend your time more wisely learning just general math/physics/chemistry instead of trying to pursue pure metallurgy. But I know nothing about your knowledge level, so it is just a stab in the dark :wink:
     
  7. Mar 12, 2009 #6
    Re: Metallurgy

    Well, I don't, I can learn how to do it at least nomadically for now. TY for taking your time on this.
     
  8. Mar 12, 2009 #7
    Re: Metallurgy

    No, wait, yea, I think I know what phase is, it's the amount of impurity inside the metal, but in your diagram it shows cast iron, and carbon steel, but no wrought, I'm interested in the basic, just-go-out-and-do-that feel, just the basics of metallurgy, so if I can't get any steel, or iron anywhere, I can still make it myself.
     
  9. Mar 12, 2009 #8

    Borek

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    Re: Metallurgy

    No, you don't know what the phase is :tongue2:
     
  10. Mar 12, 2009 #9
    Re: Metallurgy

    Ohhh, OK, sorry.
     
  11. Mar 12, 2009 #10
    Re: Metallurgy

    You might try this link, it is about metallurgy for knifemakers and people who forge steel.

    http://www.feine-klingen.de/PDFs/verhoeven.pdf [Broken]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  12. Mar 12, 2009 #11
    Re: Metallurgy

    Kool, TY dude! This'll be real useful!
     
  13. Mar 12, 2009 #12

    Astronuc

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    Re: Metallurgy

    This topic is more suited for our Materials & Chemical Engineering forum.

    Phase has to do with microstructure, which is somewhat dependent on composition.

    Wrought (steel) refers to a worked material, as opposed to cast or annealed. Materials that are hot or cold work have a greater dislocation density than cast/annealed materials.

    Wrought iron is nearly pure iron with an appreciable amount of slag impurities and with such a low carbon content so as not to qualify as steel. The 'wrought' comes from the vigorous forging and squeezing to expel a large of amount of the slag material, but it's incomplete.

    Short History of the Making of Iron and Steel
    http://www.carolinarustica.com/article.asp?ai=262&bhcd2=1236902827

    http://www.architecturaliron.com/aic/wroughtironcastiron.shtml

    A practical application - Metallurgy of the U.S. Capitol Dome
    http://www.boulder.nist.gov/div853/Publication files/NIST_TN1500_11_Dome_Micro69.pdf

    The metallography and heat treatment of iron and steel (look for pdf)

    One may wish to review articles here - http://steel.keytometals.com/default.aspx?ID=Articles [Broken]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  14. Mar 12, 2009 #13
    Re: Metallurgy

    Well, yea, but I thought wrought iron was only considered an iron due to slag? Your statement says;

    I thought if there was less carbon, it'd be called a steel, such as the rule that anything that is >2.1% carbon became iron, or is there a limit for minimal amounts of carbon? If so, what is the minimal amount of carbon necessary to consider a metal to be called an iron? Sorry if I'm underminding your prowess.
     
  15. Mar 12, 2009 #14
    Re: Metallurgy

    Ohhh, duh, TY for the sites, too.
     
  16. Mar 12, 2009 #15

    Astronuc

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    Re: Metallurgy

    I think you may be referring to cast iron, which has high carbon content.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steel
    Steel is an alloy consisting mostly of iron, with a carbon content between 0.2% and 2.14% by weight.

    Wrought iron has very little carbon, but about 1-3% slag, and cast iron starts at about 2.1% C by weight.

    Steels are generally quite clean of impurities like S, P, Cl, Mg, Ca, . . . .

    See also - http://www.steel.org/AM/Template.cfm?Section=Learning_Center [Broken]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  17. Mar 12, 2009 #16
    Re: Metallurgy

    So if it's more impure than those levels, then it's not steel? If it were possible to have completely pure iron, what would it be?
     
  18. Mar 12, 2009 #17
    Re: Metallurgy

    Man, TY alot for these sites, I really appreciate the time you're spending on this thread.
     
  19. Mar 12, 2009 #18
    Re: Metallurgy

    Sethoscott

    Iron has no appreciable carbon in it. Adding carbon to iron makes it steel, if the carbon content goes above about 2% gives you cast iron. The addition of other alloying metals such as Moly, chrome, manganese etc instill other properties in the steel. PM me with your email address and I will send you some information in MS Word format that will give you a basic understanding of steel.
     
  20. Mar 18, 2009 #19
    Re: Metallurgy

    Woody,
    I purchased an expensive cooking pot that was supposed to be anodized aluminum, but after using it several times the dark interior finish appears to be rubbing off. Do you know what is going on here? The pot cost me over a hundred U.S. dollars so I thought it was genuine but now I am not so sure.
    John Brown
     
  21. Mar 19, 2009 #20

    Borek

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    Re: Metallurgy

    Teflon?
     
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