How can I effectively study electricity as a freshman engineering student?

In summary, the conversation involves a new member asking for advice on studying electricity, specifically in relation to integration and its importance in the electrical major. The other members offer suggestions and caution against using fluid analogies in understanding electrical systems. It is also mentioned that calculus is essential in the field of EE.
  • #1
Buddy J.
5
0
hello everybody
I'm a new member, a freshman and i wanted your advice about the best way to study electricity and if you have any links to videos books any thing related can you share it please?

thanks alot
 
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  • #2
Freshman? High school? University? What math have you done?

There are different levels of knowledge about electricity. If you are interested in simple circuits (Ohms law) all you need is basic algebra. If you which to understand Electromagnetic fields you will need to have a basic knowledge and the willingness to expand that knowledge of multi variable calculus.
 
  • #4
Faculty of Engineering

i am a freshman engineering student, i am supposed to study columb's law, electric field,...and magnetism. my biggest worries is that there is too much integration involved, and i want to comprehend the material in a way that will benefit me in the next years, especially that i am considering the electrical major.
 
  • #5
Buddy, take a look at the link that berkeman has posted, there are some books listed their which you'll find useful. Hmm, don't worry for the integration ;) You'll only use it to prove theorems in EE-courses, usually you don't use it in practical situations, unless you're doing some complex calculations on theoretical level ;) Just remember to do your homework from the beginning, don't let it wait until the exam ;)
 
  • #6
MY biggest advice is to avoid the fluids analogies when thinking about electrical systems. Thinking this way eventually causes mental blocks and subtle misunderstandings.
 
  • #7
leright said:
MY biggest advice is to avoid the fluids analogies when thinking about electrical systems. Thinking this way eventually causes mental blocks and subtle misunderstandings.

I totally agree with you here. I don't why its so hard to accept the voltage-current situation.
 
  • #8
Buddy J. said:
i am a freshman engineering student, i am supposed to study columb's law, electric field,...and magnetism. my biggest worries is that there is too much integration involved, and i want to comprehend the material in a way that will benefit me in the next years, especially that i am considering the electrical major.
It is essentially impossible to avoid the mathematics if one wants to be an EE. All engineering disciplines involve some use of calculus (differential and integral), and EE is no exception. antoker and leright give some good advice, and Integral has pointed out the necessity of mutivariable calculus.
 

1. What is electricity?

Electricity is a form of energy that is created by the movement of electrons. It is a fundamental part of our daily lives and is used to power various electronic devices and machines.

2. How does electricity flow?

Electricity flows from a higher concentration of electrons to a lower concentration. This movement of electrons creates an electrical current, which is the flow of electricity through a conductor.

3. What are conductors and insulators?

Conductors are materials that allow electricity to flow through them easily, such as metals. Insulators, on the other hand, are materials that do not allow electricity to flow through them, such as rubber or plastic.

4. What are the different types of circuits?

There are two main types of circuits: series circuits and parallel circuits. In a series circuit, the components are connected in a single loop, and the current flows through each component in succession. In a parallel circuit, the components are connected in multiple branches, and the current can flow through each branch simultaneously.

5. How do I calculate electrical power?

Electrical power is calculated by multiplying the voltage (measured in volts) by the current (measured in amperes). The unit of measurement for power is watts. So, the formula for calculating power is P = VI, where P is power, V is voltage, and I is current.

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