How difficult will it be to build a 'hybrid' Jet engine?

In summary, the conversation discussed the feasibility of building a hybrid jet engine that can use both kerosene and hydrogen as fuel. The engine would use excess electricity produced by the turbine to produce hydrogen through electrolysis and then use it as fuel. However, the practicality of producing enough hydrogen and the possibility of modifying current engine designs for this purpose were also questioned. The conversation concluded with the moderator closing the thread for further discussion on the topic.
  • #1
royp
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PMM and Over-Unity mechanisms are not discussed at PF
TL;DR Summary
Can we build a jet engine which will be able to handle both Kerosene and (gaseous) Hydrogen as fuel? After burning the kerosene for a while, Hydrogen will take over as the fuel, burning to produce the exhaust gas and resulting thrust.
Hi,
Here is a question - somewhat futuristic and at the moment, hypothetical.
How difficult will it be to build a 'hybrid' Jet (turbofan) engine? The engine should be able to handle both Kerosene and (gaseous) Hydrogen as fuel. After burning the kerosene for a while, Hydrogen will take over as the fuel, burning to produce the exhaust gas and resulting thrust. Let me clarify. Imagine, there are excess electricity produced by the turbine(s) of the engine(s). This electricity will be used to produce Hydrogen by electrolysis of water and Hydrogen gas (so produced), in turn, will be fed into the engine. There is obviously the question of feasibility of producing enough Hydrogen .But the focus of my question really is: assuming there are enough supply, can an engine (with current design/architecture) be suitably modified to achieve this?
 
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  • #2
I used to do consulting work with a local patent attorney. Almost all of the attempts gain efficiency were a "partial" perpetual motion machine. I remember very well elderly farmer who was convinced he could add an air compressor to his system and regeneratively run it to his advantage. I convinced him this was unlikely and saved him some money...although maybe he would have been happier working on it...
Anyhow your jet seems very unlikely to be useful...convince me otherwise.

'/
 
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  • #3
Thread closed for Moderation...
 
  • #4
hutchphd said:
...convince me otherwise.
Not at PF. That kind of discussion is not allowed here. Thread will remain closed.
 
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Related to How difficult will it be to build a 'hybrid' Jet engine?

1. What is a hybrid jet engine?

A hybrid jet engine is a type of engine that combines elements of both a traditional jet engine and an electric motor. It uses a combination of fuel combustion and electric power to generate thrust, making it more fuel-efficient and environmentally friendly.

2. How does a hybrid jet engine work?

A hybrid jet engine works by using a traditional jet engine to compress and combust fuel, which generates hot gases that create thrust. In addition, it also has an electric motor that assists in generating thrust by using stored energy from a battery. This allows the engine to use less fuel and produce fewer emissions.

3. What are the benefits of a hybrid jet engine?

One of the main benefits of a hybrid jet engine is its improved fuel efficiency and reduced emissions. This can lead to significant cost savings for airlines and also help to reduce the environmental impact of air travel. Additionally, a hybrid jet engine can also provide increased power and performance compared to traditional jet engines.

4. What are the challenges of building a hybrid jet engine?

Building a hybrid jet engine presents several challenges, including the integration of the electric motor and battery with the traditional jet engine components. This requires advanced engineering and design expertise. Additionally, ensuring the reliability and safety of the engine is crucial, as any malfunctions could have serious consequences in flight.

5. How long will it take to build a hybrid jet engine?

The timeline for building a hybrid jet engine can vary depending on the specific design and development process. It typically takes several years of research, testing, and refinement before a hybrid jet engine is ready for commercial use. However, with advancements in technology and resources, this timeline may continue to decrease in the future.

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