How does your Garden grow?

  • #3,276
Evo
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:!!) you didn't name it after me, did you?
Yes, it made me think of you.
 
  • #3,277
dlgoff
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I just bought a Presto "Kitchen Kettle" for finish up my morels but after seeing your nice eggplant, I'm going to the greenhouse tomorrow; deep fried eggplants...yum.

I've grow them before; even the white ones, which do just a well.

post_1492152_1250713124_med.jpg
 
  • #3,278
~christina~
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I've started my collection of orchids. I admit I'm a little obsessed with them. :tongue:

Here are a few that I have.

IMG_2230_zps2876d31c.jpg

A sunset colored phalaenopsis. I found that it was a bit waterlogged and sick when I purchased it.

IMG_2231_zps81843271.jpg

A miltoniopsis orchid also known as a pansy orchid.

IMG_2235_zpse777a673.jpg

Another phalaenopsis which only has two flowers left at the moment.
 
  • #3,279
~christina~
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I have decided not to attempt a vegetable garden this year, it's cheaper to just buy them and at least I'll have some, what few grew last year were eaten by squirrels.

So, this year I am doing flowers. I just received my dwarf ever blooming day lilies today. I will have to keep the pots covered with metal grates until I get the plants going or the squirrels will dig up the bulbs and destroy them.
A side comment regarding squirrels eating plant bulbs: You can try growing daffodil bulbs around the lilly bulbs or anything else you would like to grow since they are toxic and squirrels avoid them or so I've heard. One of my previous instructors mentioned that she had a problem with tulips being eaten and found this was a good solution.
 
  • #3,280
Evo
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I've started my collection of orchids. I admit I'm a little obsessed with them. :tongue:

Here are a few that I have.

IMG_2230_zps2876d31c.jpg

A sunset colored phalaenopsis. I found that it was a bit waterlogged and sick when I purchased it.

IMG_2231_zps81843271.jpg

A miltoniopsis orchid also known as a pansy orchid.

IMG_2235_zpse777a673.jpg

Another phalaenopsis which only has two flowers left at the moment.
Wow, those are gorgeous!
 
  • #3,281
Monique
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My zucchini plants have started producing flowering buds, but the plants are still relatively small with 4 adult leaves. Should I remove the flower buds so they will invest more energy in growing leaves, or can I leave them on without too much harm?

Amazing orchids christina!
 
  • #3,282
Evo
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My zucchini plants have started producing flowering buds, but the plants are still relatively small with 4 adult leaves. Should I remove the flower buds so they will invest more energy in growing leaves, or can I leave them on without too much harm?

Amazing orchids christina!
The first blooms are male and will fall off without producing. Sounds like your plants are raring to go, just let them go through their normal process.
 
  • #3,283
Monique
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Ok I will, and today there are 6 leaves so they're growing well. The cucumbers and cilantro are doing well too, but all the other plants (tomato, paprika, watermelon) are still at the seedling stage, they're really slow to develop.
 
  • #3,284
lisab
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Ok I will, and today there are 6 leaves so they're growing well. The cucumbers and cilantro are doing well too, but all the other plants (tomato, paprika, watermelon) are still at the seedling stage, they're really slow to develop.
Sometimes a bit of cold weather will make seedlings appear to stall in their development.
 
  • #3,285
adjacent
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In my island we have so many natural gardens to which we don't even have to water.Watering comes naturally from rain.I am so happy that I have natural gardens.I enjoy them a lot.:smile:
 
  • #3,286
lisab
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In my island we have so many natural gardens to which we don't even have to water.Watering comes naturally from rain.I am so happy that I have natural gardens.I enjoy them a lot.:smile:
Sounds like you live in a paradise :cool:.

Gardening where I live is similar: the battle is getting things *not* to grow.
 
  • #3,287
Borek
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Gardening where I live is similar: the battle is getting things *not* to grow.
Mold & moss?
 
  • #3,288
Monique
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Sometimes a bit of cold weather will make seedlings appear to stall in their development.
The seeds were all planted at the same time indoors, but some were slow to develop into seedlings and the last few weeks indeed there has been little sun and cool temperatures that might have stalled them further. I didn't dare to put them outside yet, last week there was still night frost (it's been the coldest May in over 50 years).

I've planted two extra watermelon seeds, I really want some for summer. My boyfriend's mom will give me some squash seeds, so I'll give that a try as well :)
 
  • #3,289
Evo
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The seeds were all planted at the same time indoors, but some were slow to develop into seedlings and the last few weeks indeed there has been little sun and cool temperatures that might have stalled them further. I didn't dare to put them outside yet, last week there was still night frost (it's been the coldest May in over 50 years).

I've planted two extra watermelon seeds, I really want some for summer. My boyfriend's mom will give me some squash seeds, so I'll give that a try as well :)
All of those plants that are slow need a lot of sun and warmth, so being inside due to cold weather might be holding them back, but you're right, they shouldn't be outside in that weather.
 
  • #3,290
Borek
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When it is cold outside keeping plants inside can actually speed up their growth. But if weather at Monique's place was not much different from what we had here, I am not surprised plants were slow. Past years my peppers were at least twice larger.
 
  • #3,291
Evo
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Aphids!! AAAARGH!!!

My eggplants are covered with them. Not wanting to harm the non-existent predatory insects that can kill them, the past few weeks I have been, several times a day, removing and squashing the beasts. I will remove them all, and an hour later, the leaves will be covered again. I tried using some soap formulas, the aphids loved it.

No helpful insects have shown up. I think all of the pesticides the landscapers spray here have eliminated all helpful insects, haven't seen a lady bug or praying mantis yet this year.

So, I'm bringing out the big guns. I have a spray bottle of Sevin, and I'm going to use it. Die you plant suckers, DIE!
 
  • #3,292
Evo
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Wow, one application of Sevin and the aphids are gone. I wish I'd done this a couple of weeks ago.
 
  • #3,293
turbo
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Aphids and spider-mites can be controlled with a 50:50 solution of Isopropyl alcohol and water with a little Castile liquid soap (not detergent) added to provide a bit of stickiness to keep the other ingredients in contact with the bugs. This solution feeds really well through small hand triggered sprayers. It's safe and cheap and it works.
 
  • #3,294
Evo
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Aphids and spider-mites can be controlled with a 50:50 solution of Isopropyl alcohol and water with a little Castile liquid soap (not detergent) added to provide a bit of stickiness to keep the other ingredients in contact with the bugs. This solution feeds really well through small hand triggered sprayers. It's safe and cheap and it works.
Thanks turbo, I've read a bunch of articles on that, as I didn't want to use the Sevin if I could avoid it, but blog after blog said it didn't work (alcohol) more often then the ones that said it had some effect. I've done extensive reading on all of the garden forums as well as university agricultural sites over the past couple of weeks, tried a few things, nothing worked, had to go with the Sevin. Although many sites said Sevin wouldn't work on aphids, stating incorrectly that aphids don't eat the plants, so Sevin wouldn't work. But then I read a University site that said Sevin does work because aphids feed on the plant juices. Sevin kills on contact and systematically. Luckily, I don't have bees or other beneficial insects, so I don't feel badly about resorting to Sevin to save my plants. This is the first time in years I've had so many eggplants set, I owe it to the mild weather we've had, eggplants are super finicky. I'd offer you some, but I know you think they taste like cardboard coasters. :biggrin:

BTW, how's your garden this year?
 
  • #3,295
lisab
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Thanks turbo, I've read a bunch of articles on that, as I didn't want to use the Sevin if I could avoid it, but blog after blog said it didn't work (alcohol) more often then the ones that said it had some effect. I've done extensive reading on all of the garden forums as well as university agricultural sites over the past couple of weeks, tried a few things, nothing worked, had to go with the Sevin. Although many sites said Sevin wouldn't work on aphids, stating incorrectly that aphids don't eat the plants, so Sevin wouldn't work. But then I read a University site that said Sevin does work because aphids feed on the plant juices. Sevin kills on contact and systematically. Luckily, I don't have bees or other beneficial insects, so I don't feel badly about resorting to Sevin to save my plants. This is the first time in years I've had so many eggplants set, I owe it to the mild weather we've had, eggplants are super finicky. I'd offer you some, but I know you think they taste like cardboard coasters. :biggrin:

BTW, how's your garden this year?
I once bought a tub of lady bugs at a garden shop to fix an aphid problem. I called over some neighbor kids to watch the release. As soon as I released them, they, erm, got busy :redface:. Turns out they were not all ladies, and the ones that were ladies were not at all lady-like. More like bug hussies. It was a freakin' bug orgy!

The neighbor kids got a bit of nature education, I guess.

It kind of worked. The aphid population was significantly reduced, not 100% though. The lady bugs were about $10 I think.
 
  • #3,296
turbo
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I once bought a tub of lady bugs at a garden shop to fix an aphid problem. I called over some neighbor kids to watch the release. As soon as I released them, they, erm, got busy :redface:. Turns out they were not all ladies, and the ones that were ladies were not at all lady-like. More like bug hussies. It was a freakin' bug orgy!

The neighbor kids got a bit of nature education, I guess.

It kind of worked. The aphid population was significantly reduced, not 100% though. The lady bugs were about $10 I think.
Thanks, lisa. I have tons of lady-bugs, so aphids are not much of a problem, though spider-mites can be. I wish the yellow-throats and phoebes would not eat lady-bugs, though.
 
  • #3,297
ZapperZ
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Looks like this year is the year of the Roses. All my roses are growing like mad, even after I pruned them earlier this spring.

The three rose bushes near my front door are doing extremely well. They are so colorful and vibrant, neighbors walking in front of the house have commented on how bright they are. The flowers also are larger than they were last year. I did give then the same amount of fertilizers as last year early this spring, so not sure what's different this year.

hdnn.jpg


epkt.jpg


I bought three tea rose bushes earlier this spring to add to the front yard. These have deep red flowers, and they should also have bigger flowers than the one above. I was surprised that they already started blooming. I see several more buds that have yet to open. So far the flowers are fair in size, and I'm hoping that once they settle down, the flowers next year should be larger.
pn0g.jpg


f7vp.jpg


On a slightly different but related topic, when we bought the house almost 3 years ago, we inherited this metal post along the front driveway. It looks like it is a remnant of a basketball post. We wanted to get rid of it, but this is the case where it is a disadvantage that it was built too well. The landscaper company said that since it's buried in concrete, it will take quite an effort to dig it out, etc., and I didn't want to spend THAT much money just to get rid of a post.

So, following my life theme of turning lemons into lemonades, this year, I decided to mount hanging hooks on the post, and I made 4 hanging baskets to hang off the post. At least now the eye sore has been turned into something decorative. Neighbor across the street and next to us asked us when we put up the post! :) I had to tell them that it had been there all this while, and that I'm just re-purposing it! :)

Here is what it looks like:

0dwb.jpg


Now I just have to think of something clever to do with it during the holiday/winter months.

Zz.
 
  • #3,298
Evo
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Beautiful roses Zz, did you know that at one time I was a member of the ARS and local chapter, had over 80 rose bushes, and planted them in raised "themed" beds with walkways between? I had Ginger Rogers planted next to Fred Astaire, Bob Hope paired with Bing Crosby. I think I have pictures in some boxes in storage. One of my all time favorites was my Chrysler Imperial, a six foot tall bush that had 80 huge blooms on it at once. Gorgeous deep red and intoxicating fragrance. My Mister Lincoln rose was another favorite.

I love your clever use of the pole.
 
  • #3,299
ZapperZ
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I wish I am more educated about roses as you are, Evo. I'm just starting to get into it, and I don't even know the varietal that I currently have. I will have to start learning about it the way I did with orchids.

Zz.
 
  • #3,300
Evo
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I wish I am more educated about roses as you are, Evo. I'm just starting to get into it, and I don't even know the varietal that I currently have. I will have to start learning about it the way I did with orchids.

Zz.
With your success with orchids, you will find roses very forgiving and easy to have success. Do start paying attention to the names of the roses, you will be able to find lots of information on them. Tea roses are my favorite, the fullness, the fragrance, the shape.

My girlfriend at work was really obsessed and a new "mauve" rose had just been released, so she got us some. They weren't mauve, they were a sickly grey, we named them "death warmed over". They were all "pruned with a shovel" as she would put it, to make way for better plants.
 

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