How does your Garden grow?

  • #3,326
FeDeX_LaTeX
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No garden for me (I live in student halls of residence), but I keep a small assortment next to my window sill (namely parsley, thyme, basil, coriander, greek basil and mint). Makes room smell a lot nicer.
 
  • #3,327
Evo
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I have given up on trying to have a patio vegetable garden, the squirrels are relentless.

So, yesterday, I found a little meyer lemon tree and orange tree suitable for container gardening, they are starting to bloom. I am afraid to put them on the back patio because the squirrels live in the trees behind my patio, it's like putting out a sacrifice to them.

The problem is that the front of my place only gets the afternoon sun, around 4pm, and then the townhouses across the street block the sun out after a couple of hours, so this is not going to work. I know, "forget it Evo". I don't want to give up. I successfully raised a patio orange tree for years at another house, bringing it inside during the winter.

I was thinking of making a tent over them of bird netting, I guess I'll need to rig some kind of portable frame around them. Any ideas? it needs to be lightweight and easily moved or removed due to the severe storms we have, I may have to bring them inside on a moment's notice.

It will have to survive the squirrels climbing on them, you know they will try.

I am open to suggestions. I'm actually considering buying a large dog crate to put them in.

SIGH
 
  • #3,328
dlgoff
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The bird netting is really strong. I had it over my blackberries and had a heck of a time cutting it loose this spring to remove the old canes. You won't be able to just drape it over your trees as the squirrels have skinny arms. So yea, you need a frame that won't blow away from wind. Does your patio have a railing of any kind around it? If so, make use of it. You'll need to be able to lift up a side to give them care.

Of course you know what I would be having for a meal if they were my trees. :wink:
 
  • #3,329
Evo
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The bird netting is really strong. I had it over my blackberries and had a heck of a time cutting it loose this spring to remove the old canes. You won't be able to just drape it over your trees as the squirrels have skinny arms. So yea, you need a frame that won't blow away from wind. Does your patio have a railing of any kind around it? If so, make use of it. You'll need to be able to lift up a side to give them care.

Of course you know what I would be having for a meal if they were my trees. :wink:
No railing, my patio is open onto the yard.

I know the squirrels won't want to eat them, but these things will pull the fruit off just out of curiosity, then throw them on the ground.
 
  • #3,330
dlgoff
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PVC tubing, Wire-ties, and bird netting. That's what I'd use.

e.g.

HoopNetTop_IMG_0945.jpg


But a lot smaller.
 
  • #3,331
Evo
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That's awesome dl! I found some youtube video of some prepper that used bird netting over his vegetables and I have never seen such a mess. I don't know if the guy is lazy, or clueless or both. He just had piles of netting gather on the ground, on the sides, he just wadded it up haphazardly with pieces hanging loose here, wads shoved there, he didn't measure, or trim or use any care, it was awful, it was like "here is what you can do if you don't know/don't care about what you're doing".

I wish I was allowed to screen in my porch, that would solve everything. I hate not owning my own place, I haven't rented since I was in my early 20's.
 
Last edited:
  • #3,332
ZapperZ
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It is finally warm enough for me to finish up on all my planters.

x40v7.jpg


Zz.
 
  • #3,333
adjacent
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Mickey <3
 
  • #3,334
Evo
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It is finally warm enough for me to finish up on all my planters.

x40v7.jpg


Zz.
Lovely yard Zz! Does Mickey's lantern light up?
 
  • #3,335
ZapperZ
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Lovely yard Zz! Does Mickey's lantern light up?
Yes, it does. It gives a soft, white glow at night.

Zz.
 
  • #3,336
dlgoff
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Yes, it does. It gives a soft, white glow at night.

Zz.
I don't see any solar panels, must be it's using some kind of condensed matter technology. :smile:
 
  • #3,337
dlgoff
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I believe this will be a big enough garden for this year. Onions (red, yellow, & white), spinach, baby carrots, 12 cauliflower, 6 broccoli, 4 muskmelons, 3 peppers, and 3 tomatoes.

fQQHDS2.jpg
 
  • #3,338
Evo
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That's a nice looking garden!
 
  • #3,339
dlgoff
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Just thought I'd share the results of this years cauliflower.

YSLDdOM.jpg
 
  • #3,340
Evo
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Oh, I love fresh cauliflower, it tastes like butter.
 
  • #3,341
Borg
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For all of the Ghost Chili lovers. :tongue:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZVJjZG_u7Wo
 
  • #3,342
Ouabache
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Just thought I'd share the results of this years cauliflower.
very fine looking brassicas don!! :smile: i heard when heads are the size of a chicken egg is time to blanch (tie up leaves) of developing cauliflower. I wonder when did you blanch them? How loose do you tie their leaves? or perhaps you are growing a self-blanching cultivar. :wink:
 
  • #3,343
dlgoff
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very fine looking brassicas don!! :smile: i heard when heads are the size of a chicken egg is time to blanch (tie up leaves) of developing cauliflower. I wonder when did you blanch them? How loose do you tie their leaves? or perhaps you are growing a self-blanching cultivar. :wink:
I used spring-type wooden clothespin to keep the leaves shading the heads from the sun. It's the sun that yellows and hardens them. This springs cool wet cloudy weather was good for growing cauliflower, so I only had to pin up the leaves for a few days before harvesting.
 
  • #3,344
OmCheeto
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Anyone know what this garden pest is?
I can only describe it, as a micro-moth.

2013.06.28.1221pm.satans.moth.jpg

This is the first year I've seen them.
It has babies that look like that creature Khan stuck in Pavel's ear in that Star Trek movie.
Beasts!

They were in the process of killing off some weed trees in my backyard when I found them.
 
  • #3,345
Dr Transport
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the squash growing out of my compost bin is doing better than my tomatoes in the pots on the porch??? Whoda thunk it????
 
  • #3,346
Astronuc
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the squash growing out of my compost bin is doing better than my tomatoes in the pots on the porch??? Whoda thunk it????
We have observed that squash and tomatoes do much better when grown in compost. We have had both growing in our compost bin.
 
  • #3,347
lisab
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Anyone know what this garden pest is?
I can only describe it, as a micro-moth.

2013.06.28.1221pm.satans.moth.jpg

This is the first year I've seen them.
It has babies that look like that creature Khan stuck in Pavel's ear in that Star Trek movie.
Beasts!

They were in the process of killing off some weed trees in my backyard when I found them.
Could that be scale?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scale_insect
 
  • #3,348
lisab
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I think it could be scale - you need more cats.



They won't help with the scale problem. I just think you need more cats.
 
  • #3,349
dlgoff
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It's been to wet to control the squash bugs. I've only got one plant left and I might as well let them have it. I just put Zucchinis on my shopping list.
 
  • #3,350
OmCheeto
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I think it could be scale - you need more cats.

They won't help with the scale problem. I just think you need more cats.
I do not need more cats......

Anyways, I've identified the culprit: Stephanitis rhododendron

The Rhododendron Lace Bug

courtesy: http://oregonstate.edu/dept/nurspest/lacebugsonrhodies.htm

lacebugonoemeleriacroppedJPG.jpg

Adult

rhododendron%20lacebug%20nymph%20thumb.JPG

Satan's Child​

This makes sense, as I had a 15 foot tall Rhody in my backyard, which was fine, until this year. It is now dead.

Rhododendron lace-bug, Stephanitus rhododendri, is a fairly common pest of certain Rhododendrons. It is, however, rarely diagnosed correctly. It is our opinion that the symptoms may appear to many as a drought related or nutritional and thus rarely is brought to plant clinics. The other presumed reason as to why we don’t see it commonly in plant clinics is that there is an apparent host plant preference. One may find a planting of several Rhody varieties or species in close proximity and only one will be consistently infested with the bug, suggesting clear preference or conversely varietal/species resistance to the pest.
(ref)

So I probably thought that the wilting leaves last summer were due to a lack of rain. Rhodys all look very sad when they don't have enough water. I also have two other Rhodys that show no sign of infestation.

About the only good thing to come out of this, is that I've finally identified, what I called "weed trees" yesterday.

OSU link from above said:
Lacebugs can also be a problem on indian plum, pyracantha, oak, , toyon, and coyote bush.
wiki said:
Oemleria cerasiformis, a shrub commonly known as osoberry or Indian plum, is the sole species in genus Oemleria.

Native to the Pacific coast and ranges of North America, from British Columbia, Canada to Santa Barbara County, California, U.S.A.
I have at least 50 of them growing in every corner of my yard, and they always look sickly. Now I know why. A quick survey a few minutes ago indicates they are all infested.

Some people claim there is never a good reason to go to war. I say bs.


And Om's spirit, ranging for revenge,
With Ate by his side come hot from hell,
Shall in these confines with a monarch's voice
Cry 'Havoc,' and let slip the spritz bottles of war;
That this foul deed shall smell above the earth
With carrion lace bugs, groaning for burial.

:mad:

ps. The creature from Star Trek is known as the Ceti Eel. I did not know that.
 

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