How far the light can be shine?

  • Thread starter zyx_oay
  • Start date
1
0

Main Question or Discussion Point

light can be speed faster about 300,000 km/s,
but how long the distance that light can be arrive?
 

Answers and Replies

pam
455
1
You can see stars, can't you?
 
dst
376
0
Any distance until it interacts with something.
 
550
2
We've observed objects as distant as about 13 billion light years. So, we know of light that has traveled that far. (For reference, 13 billion light years is a little more than 1.2*10^26 meters. That's 120 trillion trillion meters, which is about 75 billion trillion miles.)
 
193
44
We've observed objects as distant as about 13 billion light years. So, we know of light that has traveled that far. (For reference, 13 billion light years is a little more than 1.2*10^26 meters. That's 120 trillion trillion meters, which is about 75 billion trillion miles.)
How do the scientists conclude that the particular light we received is x years old?
 
126
3
light year rings...

i would imagine triangulation and knowing the speed of light would be an unrealistically simple way of doing it...
 
248
0
Inertia still applies for EM radition, so i belive it depends entirely upon the environment into which you are shining the radiation. Since the majority of space is nearly a perfect vaccum EM radiation will countinue along its original vector untill acted upon by an outside force ie... black hole, nebula, telescope ect. Someone please correct me if im wrong.
 
russ_watters
Mentor
19,016
5,168
russ_watters
Mentor
19,016
5,168
Inertia still applies for EM radition, so i belive it depends entirely upon the environment into which you are shining the radiation. Since the majority of space is nearly a perfect vaccum EM radiation will countinue along its original vector untill acted upon by an outside force ie... black hole, nebula, telescope ect. Someone please correct me if im wrong.
Inertia is a property of mass, so it doesn't apply to light, but otherwise yes, it is similar to Newton's first law - if nothing gets in the way, it'll keep going essentially forever. The Hubble has taken pictures of objects 13 billion light years away.

http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/releases/1997/25
 
dst
376
0
Most of those methods are highly accurate, especially since stars tend to fit a very tight band of types.

Note, though, that those methods are used for stars in our galaxy. For more distant stars/galaxies, they use redshift, type 1a supernovas, and cephid variable stars (for really nearby galaxies).
Oh right, well I wouldn't know :grumpy:
 
Most of those methods are highly accurate, especially since stars tend to fit a very tight band of types.

Note, though, that those methods are used for stars in our galaxy. For more distant stars/galaxies, they use redshift, type 1a supernovas, and cephid variable stars (for really nearby galaxies).
they use the supernovae as a reference because of how much light it emits, right?
 
1
0
... black hole, nebula, telescope ect.
And eyeballs: if a photon manages to travel anything like a billion trillion miles I'd rather catch it with my eye than a ccd.
 
Andy Resnick
Science Advisor
Education Advisor
Insights Author
7,305
1,720
How do the scientists conclude that the particular light we received is x years old?
Indirect methods. One way is to measure the redshift- how far a particular emission line has been skewed. The age of the universe is determined, in part, by the redshifted background radiation (the 4 K noise).

Another way, as russ mentioned, is using "standard candles". These are sources that we "know" emit a certain amount of light:

http://csep10.phys.utk.edu/astr162/lect/cosmology/cosmicd.html

Parallax measurements are good only for very close objects.
 

Related Threads for: How far the light can be shine?

  • Last Post
3
Replies
70
Views
37K
Replies
9
Views
4K
  • Last Post
Replies
9
Views
890
Replies
6
Views
983
Replies
3
Views
828
Replies
20
Views
1K
Replies
1
Views
1K
Replies
4
Views
691
Top