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How the wedge is connected with string

  1. Apr 13, 2015 #1
    wedge system.png
    how the wedge is connected with highlighted string?
     
    Last edited: Apr 13, 2015
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 13, 2015 #2

    Simon Bridge

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    What does the description that comes with the picture say?
    I suspect the string is attached to the small weight at one end, it passes around two pulleys (attached to the wall) and then to the wedge.
     
  4. Apr 13, 2015 #3
    Did you mean"block " which is on the wedge?
     
  5. Apr 13, 2015 #4
    I think there must be some kind of hook .
     
  6. Apr 13, 2015 #5
    It only says if the wedge covers x distance horizontally in right direction,block will cover 2x distance along the wedge.
     
  7. Apr 13, 2015 #6

    jbriggs444

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    That confirms Simon Bridge's interpretation. As the wedge moves x distance from the wall, x length of string is pulled through the pulleys at the wall.

    At the pulley on top of the wedge, x length of string will have been pulled through by the wall and an additional x length of string will have been moved through by the wedge. A total 2x length of string will thus have moved through that top pulley.
     
  8. Apr 13, 2015 #7
    How?
     
  9. Apr 13, 2015 #8

    sophiecentaur

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    Just to clarify the actual layout:
    Yes. A hook, nail or eye on the vertical side of the big block holds one end of the string and the string passes freely around both pulleys (the diagram could have been drawn better!) Simon's answer is obviously correct. What do you not understand about it?
     
  10. Apr 13, 2015 #9
    Small weight?Is he talking about block?
     
  11. Apr 13, 2015 #10

    sophiecentaur

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    As there are only two objects, there is not confusion between which one is the big one and which is the small one, surely? I think you need to make a bit of an effort here.
     
  12. Apr 13, 2015 #11
    I did not directly ask.I gave my answer along with that.And also drew the image .I don't think I am showing lack of effort.It's only that I want to confirm everything.
     
  13. Apr 13, 2015 #12
    Now I am really hesitant to ask further.
     
  14. Apr 13, 2015 #13

    A.T.

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    You drew the image and ask us what it is supposed to represent?
     
  15. Apr 13, 2015 #14
    Yes.I was watching a video,in that video there was a question on this image.That video is really hard to understand because of accent.Otherwise I would have posted link of that.
     
  16. Apr 13, 2015 #15

    sophiecentaur

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    I can't find an answer. And I can't even find a proper question. You just seem to be unhappy with the PF responses. I thought you could make an effort to take on board what the answers are saying to you.
    If you gave that link and left it to us to decide what to make of it?
     
  17. Apr 13, 2015 #16
    my question.
    My answer,or you can say my attempt.

    At time 22:42
     
  18. Apr 13, 2015 #17

    Doc Al

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    Of course. Assuming nothing tricky is going on, the string attaches to the wedge at one end (with some hook or similar attachment method) and to the small block at the other end. (This is a standard physics problem configuration.)

    Was that really your question? What did you think was going on?
     
  19. Apr 13, 2015 #18
    Thanks for answering and giving your precious time for my trivial question.
     
  20. Apr 13, 2015 #19

    Doc Al

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    That will be 2 cents, please. :smile:
     
  21. Apr 13, 2015 #20

    sophiecentaur

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    Don't throw your toys out of your pram because we didn't understand what you were getting at. If you ever have further questions for PF then you may need to maintain a bit of good will here.

    AAmof, I found that video in the link you gave us, very boring but much more understandable than your question (what exactly was it?)
     
  22. Apr 14, 2015 #21
    I myself realised that it was a silly question because we physics students encounter such pulley block problems on daily basis where there is no such explanation how the block is actually attached to string,and I really didn't care but wedge was new concept for me so I became really pedantic about that and asked this question,later I realised so posted
    So,at last I genuinely thanked for answering my trivial question.
    Ok.I will try to work on your advice.
    Actually that video is on wedge constraint and pseudo force.
     
  23. Apr 14, 2015 #22

    Simon Bridge

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    Hey Gracy;
    ... how far along in high school are you and what country? I was wondering if English may not be your first language and was a little surprised at the others being so impatient.

    I see you put "pedantic" in your profile - you'll probably learn to relax that part over time and trust your own intelligence.
    Sometimes you will find you'll be expected to be able to figure out what people are telling you even if you have to stop and think about it for a little while.
    With some reflection, I'm sure you realize you could have worked out which objects I meant when I referred to the wedge and the small weight... so perhaps you just wanted to be absolutely sure you understood me? You'll get used to it :)
     
  24. Apr 15, 2015 #23
    Eleventh grade.
     
  25. Apr 15, 2015 #24

    Simon Bridge

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    USA 11th grade ... so you'd be considered NZ Y12 here.
    The block and wedge problem would not normally be seen in NZ before college ... perhaps you are studying ahead?
    The responses you got were probably better suited for a college student ;) it can seem a little unfriendly at first.
    No worries. Hope it doesn't put you off.
     
  26. Apr 15, 2015 #25
    No.Not at all.I am really comfortable here in company of such erudite teachers.
    I believe in
    "Surround yourself with only people who are going to lift you higher."-oprah winfrey
     
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