How to avoid a clash of magnetic charge and electric charge

  • #1

Main Question or Discussion Point

Hi, now I'm working on a project which involves a dc motor and high voltage. I'm developing a machine consists of a motor to rotate a platform disc and high voltage will be applied during the rotation. The problem is when I supply a positive high voltage at motor shaft during rotation, the motor stop working. While, if i supply from the top, the motor working well. Do you guys have any idea, how I can supply the high voltage properly? Thank you
 

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  • #2
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There is no such thing as magnetic charge.

Are you working in a laboratory under supervision?

How high is the voltage.

There are many types of DC motors. What type is yours?

The problem is when I supply a positive high voltage at motor shaft during rotation, the motor stop working. While, if i supply from the top,
I don't know what that means. Can you post a sketch of the schematic? Use the UPLOAD button to post pictures.
 
  • #3
tech99
Gold Member
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Hi, now I'm working on a project which involves a dc motor and high voltage. I'm developing a machine consists of a motor to rotate a platform disc and high voltage will be applied during the rotation. The problem is when I supply a positive high voltage at motor shaft during rotation, the motor stop working. While, if i supply from the top, the motor working well. Do you guys have any idea, how I can supply the high voltage properly? Thank you
I suspect the electric charge is upsetting the control electronics of the motor. I can see a component board on the motor.
 
  • #4
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While, if i supply from the top, the motor working well. Do you guys have any idea, how I can supply the high voltage properly?
Why can’t you supply it from the top, then?
 
  • #5
There is no such thing as magnetic charge.

Are you working in a laboratory under supervision?

How high is the voltage.

There are many types of DC motors. What type is yours?


I don't know what that means. Can you post a sketch of the schematic? Use the UPLOAD button to post pictures.[/QUOTEHi,
There is no such thing as magnetic charge.

Are you working in a laboratory under supervision?

How high is the voltage.

There are many types of DC motors. What type is yours?


I don't know what that means. Can you post a sketch of the schematic? Use the UPLOAD button to post pictures.
hi, im using a brushless dc motor. for now, im using 3kV.
 
  • #6
I suspect the electric charge is upsetting the control electronics of the motor. I can see a component board on the motor.
oh, i see. im used a motor driver and a microcontroller to rotate the motor. do you have any idea why its upsetting the control electronics?
 
  • #7
Why can’t you supply it from the top, then?
hi, im prefer to supply from below that form the top. its easy to design other components.
 
  • #8
tech99
Gold Member
1,814
633
oh, i see. im used a motor driver and a microcontroller to rotate the motor. do you have any idea why its upsetting the control electronics?
The electronics will use signals of just a few volts, and the CMOS semiconductors have very high input resistance. So the slightest leakage of the 3kV supply will upset them. If the 3kV supply is noisy or pulsing that will make it worse.
 
  • #9
The electronics will use signals of just a few volts, and the CMOS semiconductors have very high input resistance. So the slightest leakage of the 3kV supply will upset them. If the 3kV supply is noisy or pulsing that will make it worse.

okay, I understand it. It seems like the motor driver will have a short circuit or burn. A 3kvV is the lowest high voltage I will use. In this project, I will use up to 15kV. Do you think, supply the high voltage is a good idea? sorry, and thank you for the reply. I'm quite new in motor theory and still learning.
 
  • #10
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I don't think you should use any HV on your own with your current level of knowledge, and certainly not based on what some strangers suggested via the internet.
 
  • #11
I don't think you should use any HV on your own with your current level of knowledge, and certainly not based on what some strangers suggested via the internet.
for my project, I need to use a HV. My project is to develop a machine called centrifugal electrospinning.
 
  • #12
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@mfb is right. It does not sound like you have the qualifications to work safely with these voltages on your own. Your questions should be asked to your professor, or the laboratory supervisor; not to strangers on the Internet.

It is impossible for us to know the totality of what you are trying to do, and the details of your setup. Therefore we might give wrong answers. Please ask someone in the laboratory with you.

Thread closed.
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