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How to remove the magnetic property for screw driver?

  1. Feb 9, 2012 #1
    Referring to following video, if I magnetize my screw driver having a magnetic property in this way, I would like to reverse the process, is there any approach to completely remove this magnetic property? so there is no magnetic property from my screw driver.

    Does anyone have any suggestions?
    Thanks everyone very much for any suggestions

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oA3yC...eature=related
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 9, 2012 #2
    Why suggest anything, in your last thread you just completely ignored responses and argued them wrong.
     
  4. Feb 9, 2012 #3
    I'll bite anyway, if you heat it up to a sufficient temperature the magnetism will be removed.
     
  5. Feb 9, 2012 #4
    Do you have any suggestions on what range of temperature will be enough to remove the magnetism?
    Thanks everyone very much for any suggestions
     
  6. Feb 9, 2012 #5
    About a thousand degrees fahrenheit depending on the metal.

    So you have to get it fairly hot.
     
  7. Feb 9, 2012 #6
    Thanks you very much for suggestions
     
  8. Feb 9, 2012 #7

    sophiecentaur

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    At that temperature (God I so hate Imperial units!), you may well take the right temper out of the steel and ruin the screwdriver blade as a tool.
    If this screwdriver is really worth saving then you should look up how to harden and temper tool steel. Here are the instructions - read them. At red heat, it will have lost the permanent magnetisation.
     
  9. Feb 9, 2012 #8
    lol it's true they're horrible.

    My american mind has been brainwashed to think in them!
     
  10. Feb 9, 2012 #9

    sophiecentaur

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    At least on that link they tell you how to get the right temperature by the colour so, which ever side of the Atlantic you live, you can do the job.
     
  11. Feb 9, 2012 #10
    A thousand Fahrenheit will not quite do the job. The Curie temperature of iron, oem7110 that is the technical term for the temperature at which a material loses its magnetism, is 770 C. Or for you fans of Imperial units 1418 degrees Fahrenheit. By the way there is nothing really superior of Celsius over Fahrenheit, besides the ease of remembering the boiling and freezing temperatures of water. Now working with a socket set is another matter all together. Especially when you get to the smaller sizes. Is that a 5/32 or a 1/8? And adding pounds and ounces. Worse yet if you are British you might have to put how many "stone" something is into the mix as well. In those cases I do prefer the metric system.
     
  12. Feb 9, 2012 #11
    Ooooh, you're right, it's even hotter than I thought!

    Anyway, in general, SI units own Imperial units.
     
  13. Feb 9, 2012 #12
  14. Feb 9, 2012 #13

    sophiecentaur

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  15. Feb 9, 2012 #14

    And perhaps the nature of the plastic handle too:eek:
     
  16. Feb 9, 2012 #15
    Mmm smell those plastic fumes.
     
  17. Feb 9, 2012 #16

    boneh3ad

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    Just drop it from a reasonable height onto a hard surface. The shock that goes through the screwdriver is often enough to demagnetize something that is that weakly magnetic.
     
  18. Feb 9, 2012 #17

    sophiecentaur

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    Have you guys never actually hardened and tempered a screwdriver?
    But you are right about trying to demagnetise the handle end.
     
  19. Feb 9, 2012 #18
    I'm surprised you have!

    Seems like allot of trouble to go through unless it's your lucky screwdriver or something heh.
     
  20. Feb 9, 2012 #19
    I would like to know how this magnetic tools work in Magnetizing and Demagnetizing a screwdriver.
    Does anyone have any suggestions?
    Thanks everyone very much for any suggestions
     
  21. Feb 9, 2012 #20
    Magnetic materials can be magnetized in a magnetic field because the field will tend to align some of it's magnetic domains.

    Demagnetization works by using a changing magnetic field in an attempt to 'scramble' the magnetic domains again, which will cancel the overall magnetic properties of the object.

    Please see that link I sent you in the other thread, I think the 'true' underlying workings of magnetism would be very interesting for you.
     
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