I choosing a career in physics to pursue

In summary, the student is in grade 10 and has to choose a career for a summative study. They are interested in theoretical work and have a strong interest in computers. The student has a long list of careers from the NOC website and is seeking help in narrowing down the list and selecting a career to research. They have also expressed frustration with using criteria to make a decision and are looking for practical advice on which careers may be obsolete or experimental.
  • #1
Klashta Neali
2
0
I am only in grade 10 but stupid Careers course says I have to choose a career to do a summative study on. I want to choose something that I might go into but I can't choose. The NOC list for "Physics and Astronomy" is very long--I deleted the ones I am not interested in:
  • aerophysicist
  • aerospace research scientist
  • astronomer
  • astrophysicist
  • chemical physicist
  • cosmic ray physicist
  • cosmologist
  • cryogenics physicist
  • electricity and magnetism physicist
  • elementary particle physicist
  • elementary particle theorist
  • high-temperature physicist
  • laser physicist
  • low-temperature physicist
  • magnetism physicist
  • molecular biophysicist
  • nanotechnology physicist
  • nuclear physicist
  • nuclear reactor physicist
  • particle accelerator physicist
  • particle physicist
  • photonics physicist
  • physicist
  • physicist, elementary particles
  • physics research scientist
  • plasma physicist
  • reactor physicist
  • research scientist, aerospace
  • research scientist, physics
  • space physicist
  • theoretical nuclear physicist
  • theorist, elementary particles
  • thermal physicist
  • X-ray physicist
I know it's a long list but I don't know what to choose... I like theoretical work, research, and stuff that mostly requires thinking. A lot of thinking and pondering and philosophy stuff. I think a lot.
I am fairly skilled with computers and partway through my first computer science course.
I already know a lot about cosmology and quantum mechanics.
Please help; this is due on Friday (Nov, 6).
Something that is at least some positions/job offerings is preferable.
 
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  • #2
I think you made this unnecessarily complicated. How did you come to develop this list? I would have listed the fields of physics and not the experimental vs theoretical instead I'd use it as a criteria doing this cuts your list in half.

Why not design some criteria and score each type and then look at the high scoring ones?

Since you mentioned your interest in computers then simulation work makes sense which means theoretical physics so scratch all the experimental stuff.

Since you mention jobs then most cosmology / particle physics / cutting edge stuff is removed leaving nanotech,

You never mentioned Biology and physics perhaps that would be something you'd like for example proteomics or genomics.
 
  • #3
Why not pick one at random? It's for a report, for heaven's sake, not your life.
 
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  • #4
jedishrfu said:
I think you made this unnecessarily complicated. How did you come to develop this list? I would have listed the fields of physics and not the experimental vs theoretical instead I'd use it as a criteria doing this cuts your list in half.

Why not design some criteria and score each type and then look at the high scoring ones?

Since you mentioned your interest in computers then simulation work makes sense which means theoretical physics so scratch all the experimental stuff.

Since you mention jobs then most cosmology / particle physics / cutting edge stuff is removed leaving nanotech,

You never mentioned Biology and physics perhaps that would be something you'd like for example proteomics or genomics.
I appreciate the time you took in writing your post but clearly you didn't pay much attention to what I wrote. If you did, maybe it would have been more helpful, but it isn't.

Criteria? Really? That doesn't work. First of all I am not going to research each and every one of those; secondly, one of the career assignments was to develop a bunch of criteria and it was the dumbest thing ever. I don't choose careers like that.
I think it would make more sense if I told you I copy-pasted the list from the NOC website (which I mentioned, but since you didn't read it, you asked how I "developed" the list...). http://www5.hrsdc.gc.ca/NOC/English/NOC/2011/ViewAllTitles.aspx?val=2&val1=2111
I had also stated that I had copy-pasted and then deleted the ones I didn't think I'd be interested in. I don't know the others very well. That's why I'm asking on here. What are the others like? Which ones are experimental? Which ones can I delete? What careers are practically obsolete in job searching?
 
  • #5
I'm sorry my post didn't help. It's true I didn't notice that you got your list from the NOC list as your post doesn't explicitly state ithat that's where you got it from but upon rereading I can see what you meant.

However, you misunderstood my criteria suggestion. The criteria could be based on anything that comes to mind what you like more or what you imagine is required or what you may think you need to know because basically you just want to choose one career to write about. Its a variant of the classic way of making an informed decision using pros and cons then picking the one with the most favorable pros and least hated cons.

You could also try flipping coins to choose one career.

Please remember we are volunteers here at PF and we try to help students with their questions, we aren't here to be told how worthless our posts are even if they are less than helpful to your particular problem.
 
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Related to I choosing a career in physics to pursue

1. What is the job outlook for a career in physics?

The job outlook for a career in physics is very positive. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the demand for physicists is expected to grow by 9% between 2018 and 2028, which is faster than the average for all occupations. Additionally, the skills and knowledge gained from a career in physics are transferable to many other fields, providing even more job opportunities.

2. What education and skills are required for a career in physics?

Most careers in physics require at least a bachelor's degree in physics or a related field. However, for more advanced research or teaching positions, a master's or doctoral degree may be necessary. In addition to a strong understanding of physics concepts, skills in math, critical thinking, and problem-solving are also important for success in this field.

3. What types of jobs are available for someone with a degree in physics?

A degree in physics can lead to a variety of career paths. Some common job titles include research scientist, data analyst, engineer, teacher, and science writer. Many physics graduates also work in industries such as aerospace, defense, energy, and healthcare.

4. What are the potential salary and benefits of a career in physics?

The salary for a career in physics can vary depending on the specific job and industry. However, according to the American Institute of Physics, the median annual salary for physicists in the United States is around $120,000. In addition, many physics jobs offer benefits such as healthcare, retirement plans, and vacation time.

5. How can I prepare for a career in physics while still in school?

To prepare for a career in physics, it is important to take courses in physics, math, and computer science while in high school and college. Participating in research projects, internships, and attending conferences can also help build experience and connections in the field. Additionally, developing strong critical thinking and problem-solving skills through activities such as puzzles and coding can be beneficial for a career in physics.

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