Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

If particles always decay into particles of smaller mass, how are larger particles

  1. Feb 19, 2009 #1
    formed? I assume this has a very simple answer, I just can't seem to figure it out.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 19, 2009 #2

    HallsofIvy

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor

    Re: If particles always decay into particles of smaller mass, how are larger particle

    Don't you think the average time until decay is relevant? How long does it take a quark to decay? How long does it take a proton to decay?
     
  4. Feb 19, 2009 #3
    Re: If particles always decay into particles of smaller mass, how are larger particle

    So eventually everything in the universe will have decayed into the smallest possible form, assuming the universe is still around by then?
    Or am I totally missing your point?
     
  5. Feb 19, 2009 #4
  6. Feb 19, 2009 #5
    Re: If particles always decay into particles of smaller mass, how are larger particle

    Ah, I seem to have found the answer to my poorly worded question.
    Most of the quarks in the universe are already in their least massive generation, and these are the ones that occur most often in nature.
    So I suppose the answer to my question is yes, all of the quarks are in their smallest form, and that's the way they remain, save some rare high energy collisions creating more massive quarks, which decay quickly back into a lower massed particle.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook




Similar Discussions: If particles always decay into particles of smaller mass, how are larger particles
Loading...