Inelastic and elastic collision (please explain)

In summary, there are two types of collisions: inelastic and elastic. In an inelastic collision, objects stick together and move as one, losing energy in the form of heat and deformation. In an elastic collision, objects bounce off each other and move separately, with energy being conserved. To calculate final velocities in an inelastic collision, the principle of conservation of momentum is used. The coefficient of restitution, which measures the amount of kinetic energy conserved, affects the "bounciness" of an elastic collision. Real-life examples of inelastic collisions include car crashes and jumping on a trampoline. To determine the type of collision, one can observe the objects after the collision or calculate the coefficient of restitution.
  • #1

Homework Statement


If a object 1 & 2 collide as a perfectly inelastic collision, would they will both stop. Also If this same situation happened elastic? please explain if this is true or false and draw a free body diagram if possible.

Homework Equations


F=ma
Newton second Law
KE=1/2ma

The Attempt at a Solution


true for inelastic, false for elastic because the momentum energy will transfer.
 
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  • #2
We have to realize that momentum is conserved for all collisions hence even in any inelastic collision kinetic energy cannot be completely lost unless the total initial momentum is zero. Think it over.
 
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What is the difference between inelastic and elastic collision?

In an inelastic collision, the objects involved stick together and move as one after the collision. Energy is lost in the form of heat and deformation. In an elastic collision, the objects bounce off each other and move separately after the collision. Energy is conserved in an elastic collision.

How do you calculate the final velocities in an inelastic collision?

The final velocities in an inelastic collision can be calculated using the principle of conservation of momentum, which states that the total momentum before and after the collision remains constant. The equation for final velocity is: vf = (m1v1i + m2v2i) / (m1 + m2), where m1 and m2 are the masses of the objects and v1i and v2i are the initial velocities of the objects.

How does the coefficient of restitution affect elastic collisions?

The coefficient of restitution is a measure of how much kinetic energy is conserved in an elastic collision. It is the ratio of the relative velocities of the objects before and after the collision. A higher coefficient of restitution means that more kinetic energy is conserved, resulting in a more "bouncy" collision.

What are some real-life examples of inelastic collisions?

Inelastic collisions can be seen in everyday life, such as a car crashing into a wall, a baseball hitting a catcher's mitt, or a person jumping onto a trampoline. In all of these examples, the objects involved stick together and move as one after the collision.

How do you determine if a collision is inelastic or elastic?

The easiest way to determine if a collision is inelastic or elastic is to observe the objects after the collision. If they stick together and move as one, it is an inelastic collision. If they bounce off each other and move separately, it is an elastic collision. Additionally, you can calculate the coefficient of restitution to determine the type of collision. If the coefficient is close to 1, it is an elastic collision, and if it is less than 1, it is an inelastic collision.

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