Inner Workings of Relativity Clocks - Learn More Here!

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In summary: Hi, this is a very interesting question. One could go a little bit deeper into this and ask what physical constants are necessarily involved. If one has for instance a simple resonant L-C circuit, then such a clock would involve the dielectric permittivity and magnetic permeability of the vacuum. Other clocks could involve Plancks constant, the charge of an electron, ... (for instance in the Rydberg frequency).It would be interesting to know what constants are minimally required.
  • #1
ValenceE
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Hello to all,

Could someone give me a link that would point me towards a description of the inner workings of the famous clocks that are part of all discussions and experiments dealing with the relativity of time. What kind of clocks are those ?


Thank you,

VE
 
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  • #2
Any kind of physical clocks whatsoever, according to our current knowledge.
 
  • #3
I thought most of them were sand clocks.
 
  • #4
ValenceE said:
Hello to all,

Could someone give me a link that would point me towards a description of the inner workings of the famous clocks that are part of all discussions and experiments dealing with the relativity of time. What kind of clocks are those ?


Thank you,

VE

Hi, this is a very interesting question. One could go a little bit deeper into this and ask what physical constants are necessarily involved. If one has for instance a simple resonant L-C circuit, then such a clock would involve the dielectric permittivity and magnetic permeability of the vacuum. Other clocks could involve Plancks constant, the charge of an electron, ... (for instance in the Rydberg frequency).
It would be interesting to know what constants are minimally required.
Could someone for instance make a clock in which the frequency is only based on the magnetic permeability of the vacuum ?
 
  • #5
notknowing said:
Hi, this is a very interesting question. One could go a little bit deeper into this and ask what physical constants are necessarily involved. If one has for instance a simple resonant L-C circuit, then such a clock would involve the dielectric permittivity and magnetic permeability of the vacuum. Other clocks could involve Plancks constant, the charge of an electron, ... (for instance in the Rydberg frequency).
It would be interesting to know what constants are minimally required.
Could someone for instance make a clock in which the frequency is only based on the magnetic permeability of the vacuum ?

I just realized that the answer to my last question is definitely NO. In fact one just has to look for all combinations of "physical constants" which result in a dimension of time.
 

Related to Inner Workings of Relativity Clocks - Learn More Here!

What is the theory of relativity?

The theory of relativity, developed by Albert Einstein, is a fundamental concept in physics that explains how objects move in the universe. It is composed of two parts: the special theory of relativity, which deals with objects moving at a constant speed, and the general theory of relativity, which explains gravity and the curvature of spacetime.

How do relativity clocks work?

Relativity clocks, also known as atomic clocks, use the natural oscillation frequency of atoms to measure time. They work by counting the number of oscillations of a specific type of atom, such as cesium, and using that as a standard unit of time. The precision of these clocks is essential for GPS systems and other technologies that require accurate timekeeping.

What is time dilation in relativity?

Time dilation is a phenomenon predicted by the theory of relativity where time appears to pass at different rates for objects moving at different speeds. The faster an object moves, the slower time appears to pass for it relative to a stationary observer. This effect has been confirmed through experiments and has significant implications for our understanding of the universe.

What is the twin paradox in relativity?

The twin paradox is a thought experiment used to illustrate the effects of time dilation in the theory of relativity. It involves two identical twins, one of whom remains on Earth while the other travels in a high-speed rocket. When the traveling twin returns to Earth, they would have aged less than their stationary twin due to the effects of time dilation.

How does relativity impact our daily lives?

Relativity has a significant impact on our daily lives in ways that may not be immediately apparent. GPS technology, for example, would not be possible without taking into account the effects of time dilation on satellites and their clocks. Relativity also helps us understand the behavior of objects at high speeds and the nature of gravity, which has implications for space travel and our understanding of the universe.

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