1. Not finding help here? Sign up for a free 30min tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Integral and Fundamental Theorem of Calculus

  1. Jul 14, 2008 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    Find [tex] 2 \int 0 \ [/tex] (2-x^2)dx

    using def of the definite integral and
    using FTC


    2. Relevant equations



    3. The attempt at a solution
    any help on how to start would be great?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 14, 2008 #2

    Defennder

    User Avatar
    Homework Helper

    This looks really odd. Do you really mean [tex]2\int 0^{2-x^2} dx[/tex]?
     
  4. Jul 15, 2008 #3
    naw.I think he means integral from 0 to 2 of 2-x^2..??
     
  5. Jul 15, 2008 #4
    yeah camilus is right
     
  6. Jul 15, 2008 #5
    am i gettin it close, lim n-->infinity {[8/n^3(i^2)] +4}
     
  7. Jul 15, 2008 #6
    the answer is 4/3.

    integral from 0 to 2 of 2-x^2 = [2x-(x^3)/3] evaluated at 2. You can ignore the zero.

    2(2)-(2^3)/3 = 4 - 8/3 = (12 - 8)/3 = 4/3
     
  8. Jul 15, 2008 #7
    oh i get ya, and using ftc id get the same answer just a different way correct?
     
  9. Jul 15, 2008 #8
    thanks for the help camilus
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?