• Support PF! Buy your school textbooks, materials and every day products Here!

Integral with only one limit of integration?

  • Thread starter DieCommie
  • Start date
156
0
1. Homework Statement
Work it out with pencil and paper.
[tex] \int^x \frac{x'dx'}{1+x'^2} [/tex]


2. Homework Equations
none


3. The Attempt at a Solution
My only question is what does it mean to have only one limit of integration? I am used to doing integrals in the indefinite case with no limits of integration, or in the definite case with two limits of integration.

What does this single limit of integration mean, and what do I do with it? Do I assume 0 for the other limit? Do I just solve it as a an indefinite integral?

Thanks for any clues!


1. Homework Statement



2. Homework Equations



3. The Attempt at a Solution
 
Last edited:

Answers and Replies

cristo
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
8,056
72
I've never seen that notation before! I'd say you just integrate it indefinitely, then substitute x in for x'.
 
8
0
Yeah, I'd say set the bottom limit equal to 0 so that it makes the second part of the solution disappear.
 
HallsofIvy
Science Advisor
Homework Helper
41,736
894
The notation [itex]\int^x f(x')dx'[/itex] is just an indefinite integral. Remember that the variable inside the integral is a "dummy" variable- the "x" as a limit of integration just tells you what variable to use in the resulting function.

Do NOT set the bottom limit to 0! That is not justified.
 

Related Threads for: Integral with only one limit of integration?

  • Last Post
Replies
8
Views
613
Replies
4
Views
1K
  • Last Post
Replies
1
Views
967
Replies
2
Views
5K
Replies
7
Views
6K
Replies
7
Views
360
  • Last Post
Replies
1
Views
652
Top