Interferometric autocorrelation of sech^2 pulse?

In summary, you can get the pulse width from interferometric autocorrelation by taking an autocorrelation of the sech2 envelope.
  • #1
IcedCoffee
21
4
I know that from intensity autocorrelation, I simply need to divide the FWHM by 1.53 for sech2 pulses.

But I can't seem to be able to find any reference on how to get pulse width from interferometric autocorrelation signal.

Can someone help me?
 
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  • #2
What is the difference between "interferometric autocorrelation" and "intensity autocorrelation"?
 
  • #3
IcedCoffee said:
Summary:: How do I get the pulse width from interferometric autocorrelation?

I know that from intensity autocorrelation, I simply need to divide the FWHM by 1.53 for sech2 pulses.

But I can't seem to be able to find any reference on how to get pulse width from interferometric autocorrelation signal.

Can someone help me?
I assume you meant '"field autocorrelation" instead of "Intensity autocorrelaton". What was your reference regarding "I know that from intensity autocorrelation, I simply need to divide the FWHM by 1.53 for sech2 pulses."? Was that numerical factor derived in your reference?
 
  • #4
Baluncore said:
What is the difference between "interferometric autocorrelation" and "intensity autocorrelation"?
Intensity autocorrelation uses second harmonic generation from two non-collinear beam. It cannot resolve the fringes of a multi-cycle pulse.
Interferometric autocorrelation uses two collinear beam. The generated second harmonics beam is thus collinear with the two beams, and is affected by interference pattern.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Optical_autocorrelation
 
  • #5
Andy Resnick said:
I assume you meant '"field autocorrelation" instead of "Intensity autocorrelaton". What was your reference regarding "I know that from intensity autocorrelation, I simply need to divide the FWHM by 1.53 for sech2 pulses."? Was that numerical factor derived in your reference?
There seems to be some difference between "field autocorrelation" and "interferometric autocorrelation" - the latter uses second harmonic generation while the first directly measures the pulse itself. As for the reference, I couldn't find the detailed derivation but I believe taking an autocorrelation of sech2 envelope can be done.

https://www.brown.edu/research/labs...ch.labs.mittleman/files/uploads/lecture14.pdf
 
  • #6
IcedCoffee said:
There seems to be some difference between "field autocorrelation" and "interferometric autocorrelation" - the latter uses second harmonic generation while the first directly measures the pulse itself. As for the reference, I couldn't find the detailed derivation but I believe taking an autocorrelation of sech2 envelope can be done.

https://www.brown.edu/research/labs...ch.labs.mittleman/files/uploads/lecture14.pdf
Slides 15, 17-21 have the relevant calculations; are you able to verify the numerical factors on your own?
 

1. What is interferometric autocorrelation of sech^2 pulse?

Interferometric autocorrelation is a technique used to measure the pulse duration of ultrashort laser pulses. The sech^2 pulse is a mathematical model that describes the shape of the pulse.

2. How does interferometric autocorrelation work?

In interferometric autocorrelation, the pulse is split into two identical beams that are then recombined. The resulting interference pattern is recorded and analyzed to determine the pulse duration.

3. What is the advantage of using sech^2 pulse in interferometric autocorrelation?

The sech^2 pulse has a well-defined shape that allows for accurate measurement of the pulse duration. It also has a flat top, which makes it easier to measure the peak intensity of the pulse.

4. Can interferometric autocorrelation measure pulses of any duration?

No, interferometric autocorrelation is most accurate for measuring pulses with durations in the femtosecond range. It becomes less accurate for pulses that are shorter or longer than this range.

5. Are there any limitations to using interferometric autocorrelation for measuring pulse duration?

Yes, interferometric autocorrelation can only measure the pulse duration of a single laser pulse. It cannot measure the duration of a train of pulses or pulses with varying durations.

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