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Physics Inventor and physicist, what to study?

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I want to be an inventor that focuses on physics, I have the chance to study university but I don’t know what is the best career. I know inventing is much more than a degree, but I wanted to know which degree or degrees would help me more?
 

berkeman

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Welcome to the PF.

To be a good inventor, you need a strong technical background in physics and/or engineering, IMO. Keep working hard in your undergrad education, and do lots of side projects that interest you. The more projects you build on your own, the better you learn to "ask the right questions" as you do your studies. The projects that I built on my own in my undergrad EE work helped me a lot to see things that I wasn't learning as well as I should have, and motivated me to learn the important things more in depth.

Enjoy the ride! :smile:
 

ZapperZ

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I want to be an inventor that focuses on physics, I have the chance to study university but I don’t know what is the best career. I know inventing is much more than a degree, but I wanted to know which degree or degrees would help me more?
What do you mean by "inventing", and what exactly do you mean by "inventor that focuses on physics"?

Since it appears that you don't have a degree yet in physics, or in inventing (engineering), how do you know what invention focuses on physics, and whether there is a need for such a thing?

Zz.
 
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What do you mean by "inventing", and what exactly do you mean by "inventor that focuses on physics"?

Since it appears that you don't have a degree yet in physics, or in inventing (engineering), how do you know what invention focuses on physics, and whether there is a need for such a thing?

Zz.
I mean solving problems in the real world by building devices or mechanisms which involve physics. For example let’s say the problem is that to much energy from the vehicle is being consumed by friction. I invent a super conductor levitating car, that cools down temperature to be super conductive (until we discover a super conductive material at room temperature)
 

ZapperZ

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I mean solving problems in the real world by building devices or mechanisms which involve physics. For example let’s say the problem is that to much energy from the vehicle is being consumed by friction. I invent a super conductor levitating car, that cools down temperature to be super conductive (until we discover a super conductive material at room temperature)
That is more of an engineering problem than a physics problem.

You need to keep in mind that just because something is possible does not mean that it will be adopted. There are many external factors that dictate whether some "invention" is successful or not. For example, we can build very strong buildings that can withstand the strongest earthquakes, but if it costs way more than anyone can afford, then no one is going to pursue that. The invention of anything requires not just a device that can do something, but also other factors such as costs, the feasibility of mass production, etc... etc. If your levitating car costs way more money to operate than the typical vehicle, how many people do you think will adopt it?

These are all not physics issues. And invention that do not consider any of those other factors are often doomed to disappear into obscurity.

Zz.
 
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That is more of an engineering problem than a physics problem.

You need to keep in mind that just because something is possible does not mean that it will be adopted. There are many external factors that dictate whether some "invention" is successful or not. For example, we can build very strong buildings that can withstand the strongest earthquakes, but if it costs way more than anyone can afford, then no one is going to pursue that. The invention of anything requires not just a device that can do something, but also other factors such as costs, the feasibility of mass production, etc... etc. If your levitating car costs way more money to operate than the typical vehicle, how many people do you think will adopt it?

These are all not physics issues. And invention that do not consider any of those other factors are often doomed to disappear into obscurity.

Zz.
Definitely, I understand inventing is much more than just building the products but considering costs, mass production and more.

After listening I think I’m between 2 careers:
- mechanical engineering or physics

Mechanical engineering because I like the designing process and also like mechanics.

Physics because I think it teaches me more physics concepts to invent.

Which one would you advice me?
 

russ_watters

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After listening I think I’m between 2 careers:
- mechanical engineering or physics

Mechanical engineering because I like the designing process and also like mechanics.

Physics because I think it teaches me more physics concepts to invent.

Which one would you advice me?
Nothing you've said so far implies physics, so I'd say engineering.
 
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Many engineering schools offer degrees in engineering physics. You can also easily pursue almost any engineering concentration if you start in engineering physics and wish to switch anytime later.
 

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