Is a Permanently Sterile Surface Possible with Chemical Coating Technology?

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In summary, the conversation discusses the topic of finding a course project in a materials science class. One idea that stood out was a coating that can be applied to surfaces and render them permanently sterile by reacting with the cell membrane of microbes. The coating is chemically bonded to the surface and cannot be washed or chipped off. The person also mentions researching titanium oxide ceramics and UV light for this project, but notes that achieving complete sterility may be difficult due to the presence of hard-to-kill pathogens without cell membranes. They also request additional resources or information on this topic.
  • #1
Will
I am in a materials science class and need to come up with a course project. One thing that interested me was in an article that I read in the paper a while back. It was about the development of some kind of coating that could be applied to surface that could render it permanently sterile. I think it worked by reacting with the cell membrane of a microbe, destroying it and killing the pathogen. I also thought I remember reading that this coating could not be washed or chipped off, like it was chemically bonded to the surface or something.
Any additional resources, links or information would be greatly appreciated!

Will
 
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  • #2
Search "titanium (oxide) ceramic(s) + uv."
 
  • #3
While 'antiseptic' is possible, I don't see sterile as possible. Sterile means 'completely without life', therefore you would have to account for 'hard pathogens' such as baccilus and clostridium spores, mold spores, and mycobacterium. All of which are hard to kill and do not have a cell membrane (except for mycobacterium and that is more of a waxy membrane).
 

Related to Is a Permanently Sterile Surface Possible with Chemical Coating Technology?

1. How does a surface become permanently sterile?

In order for a surface to become permanently sterile, it must undergo a process called sterilization. This process involves eliminating all forms of microbial life, including bacteria, viruses, and spores. Common methods of sterilization include heat, chemical treatment, and irradiation.

2. What is the difference between sterilization and disinfection?

Sterilization is the complete elimination of all microorganisms, while disinfection only reduces the number of microorganisms to a level that is considered safe for human contact. Disinfection is typically used for surfaces that cannot withstand the high heat or chemicals used in sterilization.

3. Can any surface be made permanently sterile?

No, not all surfaces can be permanently sterile. Porous materials, such as wood and cloth, can harbor microorganisms deep within their structure, making it difficult to completely sterilize them. Non-porous materials, such as metal and glass, are easier to sterilize and can be made permanently sterile.

4. How long does a surface stay sterile after being treated?

The length of time a surface stays sterile depends on several factors, including the type of treatment used, the type of surface, and the environment in which the surface is located. For example, a surface that has been sterilized with heat may stay sterile for a longer period of time than one that has been treated with chemicals.

5. What are the risks of using non-sterile surfaces?

The use of non-sterile surfaces can pose a significant risk to human health, as they can harbor harmful microorganisms that can cause infections and diseases. This is especially true in healthcare settings, where sterile surfaces are crucial in preventing the spread of infections among patients and healthcare workers.

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