Is it possible to use Quantam entanglement to study event horizon

In summary, the conversation discusses the possibility of using quantum entanglement to observe and gather information about the physical properties of particles within the event horizon of a black hole. However, it is not possible to use quantum entanglement for this purpose as it cannot be used to send information faster than the speed of light. Previous discussions on this topic have also concluded that exchanging information about measurements of entangled particles can reveal interesting statistical patterns, but both parties must exchange information for this to occur.
  • #1
kkragam
1
0
I have a doubt/question/idea what ever it may be some thing like this

Theoretically is it possible if we place one of twin electrons(Quantum entanglement)into event horizon of Black hole and observe the second one on earth, so that what is happening in Black holes? i.e how electron's inside event horizon have physical properties such as position, momentum, spin, polarisation, etc are correlated with first one on earth?
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
It is not possible. This is a variant of the often-asked question, "can we use quantum entanglement to send a faster-than-light message?" and the answer is no. Search around this forum and you'll find some explanations of why not.
 
  • #3
Nugatory said:
It is not possible. This is a variant of the often-asked question, "can we use quantum entanglement to send a faster-than-light message?" and the answer is no.

But suppose an experimental probe was orbiting the black hole; it could create entangled photons, and ship one over the event horizon, and study the ones kept. This does not seem to involve any FTL transfer of information.

Why wouldn't this provide some useful information?
 
  • #4
kkragam said:
i.e how electron's inside event horizon have physical properties such as position, momentum, spin, polarisation, etc are correlated with first one on earth?
Indeed, in this way by measuring spin of the particle on Earth, you may determine the spin of the corresponding twin-particle inside the event horizon. But so what? In this way you cannot learn anyhing interesting. In particular, you cannot learn anything about the other black-hole degrees of freedom which are not directly related to your twin particle.
 
  • #5
UltrafastPED said:
But suppose an experimental probe was orbiting the black hole; it could create entangled photons, and ship one over the event horizon, and study the ones kept. This does not seem to involve any FTL transfer of information.

Why wouldn't this provide some useful information?
Why don't you try what Nugatory suggested, UltrafastPED? Just type "entangled black hole" into the Search box at the top of the page. You'll find many previous threads that answer the question for you.
 
  • #6
UltrafastPED said:
But suppose an experimental probe was orbiting the black hole; it could create entangled photons, and ship one over the event horizon, and study the ones kept. This does not seem to involve any FTL transfer of information.

Why wouldn't this provide some useful information?

For the same reason that the standard EPR arrangment in flat space can't be used to send useful information.
 
  • #7
UltrafastPED said:
But suppose an experimental probe was orbiting the black hole; it could create entangled photons, and ship one over the event horizon, and study the ones kept. This does not seem to involve any FTL transfer of information.

Why wouldn't this provide some useful information?
The "spooky action at a distance" produces interesting statistical results. However, you can't tell that you have those interesting statistics until you compare what has been measured at the two distant points.

If you have a two streams of entangled particles, one measured at location A, the other at B, at first glance neither A nor B see anything beyond a random results. Only when A and B exchange information about their measurements that patterns emerge.

So if A is above the event horizon and B is below, Alice at A can sent Bob at B her results and B can then read any message that Alice may have transmitted but since Bob cannot transmit anything to Alice, she will remain in the dark about everything about Bob's measurements.
 
  • Like
Likes 1 person
  • #8
Bill_K said:
Why don't you try what Nugatory suggested, UltrafastPED? Just type "entangled black hole" into the Search box at the top of the page. You'll find many previous threads that answer the question for you.

If this is such a common thread, perhaps it should be in the FAQ.
 

Related to Is it possible to use Quantam entanglement to study event horizon

1. What is quantum entanglement?

Quantum entanglement is a phenomenon in quantum physics where two or more particles become connected in such a way that the state of one particle can affect the state of the other, regardless of the distance between them.

2. How can quantum entanglement be used to study event horizons?

Quantum entanglement can be used to study event horizons by entangling particles on either side of the event horizon and observing how the entanglement is affected by the gravitational pull of the black hole. This can provide insight into the properties of the event horizon, such as its size and shape.

3. Is quantum entanglement a reliable method for studying event horizons?

At this point, quantum entanglement is still a theoretical concept and has not been tested or proven to be a reliable method for studying event horizons. However, it is a promising area of research that has the potential to provide valuable insights into the nature of black holes.

4. Could quantum entanglement help us understand the information paradox of black holes?

The information paradox of black holes is a well-known problem in physics, and it is not clear if quantum entanglement can provide a solution. However, some theories suggest that quantum entanglement may play a role in resolving this paradox by preserving information that is thought to be lost in black holes.

5. Are there any current experiments or studies using quantum entanglement to study event horizons?

There are currently no experiments or studies using quantum entanglement to directly study event horizons. However, there are ongoing experiments and research in quantum physics that may provide insights into the potential use of entanglement to study black holes in the future.

Similar threads

  • Quantum Physics
Replies
14
Views
872
Replies
3
Views
979
Replies
9
Views
1K
Replies
5
Views
1K
  • Quantum Physics
Replies
4
Views
1K
Replies
13
Views
119
  • Special and General Relativity
Replies
11
Views
894
  • Special and General Relativity
Replies
21
Views
2K
  • Quantum Physics
Replies
11
Views
1K
Replies
58
Views
519
Back
Top