1. Not finding help here? Sign up for a free 30min tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Is there any software which can plot the graph of any function provide

  1. May 23, 2008 #1
    When the first derivative is 0, then those corresponding points represent the maxima or minima. Is it always true? What r points of inflexion? And why is the derivative 0 there? At which other points is the derivative 0?


    Is there any software which can plot the graph of any function provided to it as input?

    regards,
    Ritwik
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 7, 2014
  2. jcsd
  3. May 24, 2008 #2

    CompuChip

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    What is the derivative of a function? What does it mean "geometrically" (as in: relating to the graph of the function) when the derivative is 0 in a point?

    Points of inflection are those points where the derivative vanishes, but there is not a minimum or a maximum (for example, the point x = 0 for the graph x3).

    Finally, yes, such software exists (Mathematica, MatLab, Maple) which can plot functions in up to 3 dimensions, but is usually very expensive. You could check at your school / university / ... if they have it installed or available for students to take. But if you Google for "function grapher" or something like that, you will probably find a lot of simple ones already (this one, for example).
     
  4. May 24, 2008 #3

    HallsofIvy

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor

    This is incorrect. A "point of inflection" is a point where the second derivative changes sign. It is not necessary that the derivative be 0 there. As long as the function is twice differentiable, it is necessary that the second derivative be 0 there.
     
  5. May 24, 2008 #4

    CompuChip

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    Ah, you're right. I thought that "point of inflection" was synonymous with "saddle point", but the latter is just a special case. Sorry for the confusion.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?



Similar Discussions: Is there any software which can plot the graph of any function provide
  1. Can Any Genius Answer (Replies: 3)

Loading...