Is this analogy of the electrodes in a battery right?

In summary, a zinc/copper Danielle cell can be compared to a glass of water, where the water molecules represent electrons. The charge of the zinc electrode is like a full glass of water, and when more water is added, it overflows, just like electrons leaving the zinc electrode. An equivalent analogy for the other electrode could be adding a pump and a control valve to maintain a balance of electrons entering and leaving. It is important to note that zinc does not hold a certain amount of electrons to become negatively charged, as it gives electrons instantly in a redox reaction to become zn2+. Therefore, the zinc electrode is never negatively charged.
  • #1
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In a zinc / copper danielle cell could we say that the Zinc electrode is like a glass of water (water molecules are electrons) The full glass of water reprenst the charge of the zinc electrode and when you try to fill it with more water it overflows (electrons leave the zinc electrode)
 
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  • #2
You would need to provide an equivalent analogy for the other electrode. I can’t think of one that follows quite as nicely as for the zinc.
You would perhaps add a pump and a control valve which allows an electron in at the bottom for every one that leaves the top, perhaps according to the pressure inside.
 
  • #3
I meant do the zinc hold a certain amount of electrons to become negatively charged
When we learned about redox reactions they say that zinc gives electrons instantly as it becomes zn2+ thus the zinc is never negatively charged
 

Related to Is this analogy of the electrodes in a battery right?

1. What is an analogy of the electrodes in a battery?

An analogy of the electrodes in a battery is like a faucet. Just as a faucet controls the flow of water, the electrodes control the flow of electrons in a battery.

2. How do the electrodes work in a battery?

The electrodes in a battery are made of different materials, typically a metal and a non-metal. When the battery is connected to a circuit, a chemical reaction occurs at the electrodes, causing one to lose electrons (the anode) and the other to gain electrons (the cathode). This creates a flow of electrons, which is the electric current.

3. Can you explain the role of the electrodes in a battery?

The electrodes play a crucial role in a battery by converting chemical energy into electrical energy. The anode releases electrons, while the cathode absorbs them, creating a flow of electrons that can be used to power devices.

4. Why are the electrodes in a battery important?

The electrodes are important because they are the key components that allow a battery to function. Without the electrodes, there would be no flow of electrons, and the battery would not be able to provide power.

5. Is the analogy of the electrodes in a battery accurate?

The analogy of the electrodes in a battery is a simplified explanation of how they work, but it is generally accurate. In reality, the chemical reactions that occur at the electrodes are more complex, but the comparison to a faucet is a helpful way to understand the basic concept.

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