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Engineering Jobs outside the country

  1. Oct 18, 2016 #1
    Hello,

    How easy is it to get a job outside the country in which you currently reside? I mean, so far I got responses only from the city where I live regarding my job applications, although I've applied to job positions all over the country. I even haven't gotten any response from any other province so far (I live in Canada). I wonder how would it be if it's a different country, not just a different province. How do they interview you when you live remotely from the job's location? Are personal interviews mandatory at the end? and who will pay the travel expenses in that case?

    Thanks
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 18, 2016 #2

    Simon Bridge

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    Depends on the job, the employer, and the country - I live in NZ, there are agencies that help people from NZ find work in the UK for eg. and there are deals with a variety of countries allowing work visas where those countries specifically want the skills involved.
    Everything else was up for grabs.

    I have been head-hunted for work in the USA for example - in that case, the costs of travel and relocating were to be paid by the company.
    I had a mate who was paid to travel to the US every summer to work as a software engineer ... until he got turned back one year by the FBI.
    A big firm may interview you in a local office for an overseas position.
    It really depends - there are no rules for how they do it.
    Generally, though, if a firm can fill a position locally they are usually required, by local visa regulations, to do so.
    If you want to do the work, try finding a country where your particular skills are in short supply and look into who's hiring there.
     
  4. Oct 18, 2016 #3
    Thanks. I'll be more precise. I'm an immigrant to Canada, but I couldn't find a job so far as I'm finishing my current position soon. I've been searching for a job for a couple of months now, and from the responses I (don't) get, I'm not very optimistic. I guess I was very lucky to secure my first position. So, I was thinking to go to my home country (the costs of living there is much less), and apply to jobs in Canada from there. But I'm afraid being outside Canada would reduce my chances of being called to interviews.

    What I'm trying to say is that I have two options:
    • Stay in Canada and try to find a job from within Canada: this option means I have some expenses to pay monthly (which is a fair amount; rent+Internet+phone+electricity+living expenses ... etc), while finding a job isn't guaranteed when to happen, if any. I'm afraid to run out of money and spend all my savings while waiting/hoping to find a new position.
    • Go to my home country and apply to jobs from outside Canada: this option means that I have much less expenses to pay, but I'm afraid this would make my chances even less probable to get a job in Canada than if I stayed in Canada.
    Note: I've been working in the academia, but I'm trying to make a transition to the industry, so I have no or little experience.
     
    Last edited: Oct 19, 2016
  5. Oct 19, 2016 #4

    Simon Bridge

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    I see ... then you will need to know what Canada govt rules about importing workers is like.
    It sounds like the market for your skills is better in Canada than back home - so maybe you should take a look at how native Canadians handle the situation you are in.
    Whichever way - you need to talk to Canadians.
     
  6. Oct 20, 2016 #5

    StatGuy2000

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    My response would be to stay in Canada and try to find a job from within. Going back to your home country would make you far less competitive when seeking work here as employers have a strong preference for those who are resident in Canada.

    While I don't have the statistics available, from what people have told me, it can take up to 6 months for a new graduate to find permanent employment. Given that you've only been searching for a couple of months, my suggestion would be to keep at it applying for companies in Canada (focusing on employers in Ontario or Alberta, as those provinces probably have what you are looking for).

    I would also strongly suggest you apply for positions in the US, since there is a greater demand for engineers there than in Canada (although this advice will depend on if you're a citizen of Canada, in which case it would be relatively easy to get one of the special visas open to Canadian citizens).
     
  7. Oct 20, 2016 #6
    Thanks. I'm actually a permanent resident, not a citizen yet, that's why I haven't applied outside Canada. The problem is that I'm not even a new graduate. New graduates at least still have the theory fresh in their minds. I've spent about two years in the academia (related to my advanced degree) and now I'm applying to another field in the industry (related to my undergraduate degree). Probably I will stay for a couple more months and see what happens.
     
  8. Oct 20, 2016 #7

    StatGuy2000

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    BTW, if you don't mind my asking, what country are you originally from? And do you have any intention about applying for Canadian citizenship?

    PM me if you don't feel comfortable responding in the thread.
     
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2016
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