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Lagrangian aproach.Learning materials.

  1. Feb 19, 2013 #1
    Hello.I recently discovered the Lagrangian aproach on classical mechanics ptovlems, such as a spring pendullum, or even on particle physics problems, and i think it s a really smart way of getting results.
    I'd like to aproach this method deeper and so my questions are the following:
    1.What are the calculus operations that you need to master?From what I've seen you need derrivatives and partial derrivatives.
    2.Coud you recommend me some rookie undergraduate course on Lagrangians?But nothing to stuffy.
    3.I woud apreciate if you coud tell me your own opinion about this method.:)

    Thank you!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 19, 2013 #2
    Differential and integral calculus is essential, as everywhere in physics. Also linear algebra is highly required, particularly eigenvalue calculation, properties of symmetry, positivity, and others of matrices.
    A very good book on the subject is Goldstein's Classical Mechanics, it may have more than you seek but it surely goes deeply throughout what you seek.
    The Lagrangian approach is the base of all modern physics, so even if in classical mechanics this approach "only" gives a deeper insight ans power on the subject which Newton's laws by themselves do not provide, its results are essential to any further study in physics!
     
  4. Feb 19, 2013 #3

    WannabeNewton

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    Last edited by a moderator: May 6, 2017
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