Light Speed Relativity: A Puzzling Question

In summary, if you are moving close to the speed of light and turn on a light inside a spaceship, you will see the light go across the room instantaneously due to time relativity.
  • #1
Nel
3
0
So let me first off say i probably have no idea what I am talking about. I am simply a junior in high school whos only knowledge of physics is that of what i try to research on my own time. I really do like it though.

But it is my understanding that light speed is a consistent rate and no matter how fast you are moving you can not increase the speed of light.

So here is the question:

If you were in a spaceship moving at 99.5% the speed of light from left to right and you turn on a light inside the cabin which made the light travel left to right. Would you be able to see the light go across the room in a like slow mode manner due to your speed is so close to that of light or would it be instant due to time relativity? or do i just not have a clue what I'm talking about?

(ps this is not homework)
 
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  • #2
All observers will always measure light at c, regardless of their speed. Both the people on your ship and people that are stationary relative to it (Earth), would measure the light moving at the normal speed of light. It would be due to time dilation, and length contraction.
 
  • #4
Nel said:
So let me first off say i probably have no idea what I am talking about. I am simply a junior in high school whos only knowledge of physics is that of what i try to research on my own time. I really do like it though.

But it is my understanding that light speed is a consistent rate and no matter how fast you are moving you can not increase the speed of light.

So here is the question:

If you were in a spaceship moving at 99.5% the speed of light from left to right and you turn on a light inside the cabin which made the light travel left to right. Would you be able to see the light go across the room in a like slow mode manner due to your speed is so close to that of light or would it be instant due to time relativity? or do i just not have a clue what I'm talking about?

(ps this is not homework)

It turns out that you'll measure the light to travel at c anyway, and so will someone standing outside the ship who is considered motionless. The reason is that you register, say, 1 tick on your clock and the motionless guy registers, say, 500 ticks. Read up on it, you need to learn about how waves (like sound) behave and about the Lorentz transformations.
 

1. What is the theory of light speed relativity?

The theory of light speed relativity, also known as special relativity, was developed by Albert Einstein in the early 20th century. It states that the laws of physics are the same for all observers in uniform motion and that the speed of light in a vacuum is constant for all observers, regardless of their relative motion.

2. How does light speed relativity impact our understanding of time and space?

According to the theory of light speed relativity, time and space are relative and interconnected. This means that the passage of time and the measurement of distance depend on the observer's relative motion. This is why time can appear to pass slower for objects moving at high speeds and why distances can appear to be shorter when objects are moving at high speeds.

3. Can anything travel faster than the speed of light?

According to the theory of light speed relativity, the speed of light is the maximum speed that any object can travel. This means that nothing, including matter, energy, or information, can travel faster than the speed of light in a vacuum.

4. How does light speed relativity impact our understanding of the universe?

Light speed relativity has had a significant impact on our understanding of the universe. It has helped us develop a better understanding of the structure of space and time, the behavior of matter and energy, and the nature of the universe as a whole. It has also played a crucial role in the development of technologies such as GPS and particle accelerators.

5. Are there any real-life applications of light speed relativity?

Yes, there are many real-life applications of light speed relativity. As mentioned before, GPS technology relies on the principles of light speed relativity to accurately measure time and distance. Particle accelerators also use these principles to study the behavior of particles at high speeds. Additionally, the theory of light speed relativity has led to advancements in fields such as astrophysics, cosmology, and quantum mechanics.

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