Losing Wifi hotspot when connecting to signal

  • #1
jack action
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Summary:
Wifi hotspot on PC disconnects when phone tries to connect to it.
New to Wifi. I bought the following wifi network adapter to make my PC a hotspot for my new smart phone to connect to:

14931641.png


I could finally make it work by installing the driver from kelebek333 (from the PPA repo).

I created a wifi connection with a method similar to this one. (The IPv4 & IPv6 settings are set to 'shared to other computers')

I can activate the connection successfully, but as soon as I turn the phone on and it tries to connect to the wifi signal, the PC connection drops. Sometimes, it can last for a few seconds, just enough to download some notifications. Sometimes it drops by itself, but I think it is because some of my neighbors' machines try to connect to my wifi signal.

What could be the problem? The driver? The hardware itself? Wrong set-up? Some info about my system:

Code:
inxi -FN
Code:
System:
  Host: maison Kernel: 5.4.0-72-generic x86_64 bits: 64 Desktop: Xfce 4.14.2
  Distro: Linux Lite 5.0 LTS
Machine:
  Type: Desktop Mobo: Micro-Star model: B450M PRO-M2 (MS-7B84) v: 1.0
  serial: <superuser/root required> UEFI: American Megatrends v: 2.E3
  date: 06/11/2020
CPU:
  Topology: Quad Core model: AMD Ryzen 3 2200G with Radeon Vega Graphics
  bits: 64 type: MCP L2 cache: 2048 KiB
  Speed: 1520 MHz min/max: 1600/3500 MHz Core speeds (MHz): 1: 1423 2: 1432
  3: 1467 4: 1418
Graphics:
  Device-1: AMD Raven Ridge [Radeon Vega Series / Radeon Vega Mobile Series]
  driver: amdgpu v: kernel
  Display: x11 server: X.Org 1.20.9 driver: amdgpu,ati
  unloaded: fbdev,modesetting,vesa resolution: 1920x1080~60Hz
  OpenGL: renderer: AMD RAVEN (DRM 3.35.0 5.4.0-72-generic LLVM 11.0.0)
  v: 4.6 Mesa 20.2.6
Audio:
  Device-1: AMD Raven/Raven2/Fenghuang HDMI/DP Audio driver: snd_hda_intel
  Device-2: AMD Family 17h HD Audio driver: snd_hda_intel
  Sound Server: ALSA v: k5.4.0-72-generic
Network:
  Device-1: Realtek RTL8111/8168/8411 PCI Express Gigabit Ethernet
  driver: r8169
  IF: enp37s0 state: up speed: 100 Mbps duplex: full mac: 30:9c:23:d6:6c:6b
  Device-2: Realtek 802.11n type: USB driver: rtl8188fu
  IF: wlx1cbfceea0202 state: down mac: 1c:bf:ce:ea:02:02
Drives:
  Local Storage: total: 447.13 GiB used: 129.86 GiB (29.0%)
  ID-1: /dev/sda vendor: Patriot model: Burst size: 447.13 GiB
Partition:
  ID-1: / size: 438.62 GiB used: 129.85 GiB (29.6%) fs: ext4 dev: /dev/sda2
Sensors:
  System Temperatures: cpu: 26.8 C mobo: N/A gpu: amdgpu temp: 26 C
  Fan Speeds (RPM): N/A
Info:
  Processes: 255 Uptime: 45m Memory: 13.68 GiB used: 2.15 GiB (15.7%)
  Shell: bash inxi: 3.0.38
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
anorlunda
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I had that problem too. It was my provider enforcing a rule that you can't be a WiFi hotspot at the same time you're getting WiFi signal in from another source. I never found a way around it.

In my RV park, I subscribe to a WiFi service. They charge per device, so I paid for only one device at a time. I had the idea that I could use my phone as the one device, but make the one a hotspot hub for all my other devices. They outfoxed me. I don't know if they did that with the help of my cell provider or not. I have no app from the WiFi service provider on the phone.

Edit: I view it as a form of them enforcing their digital rights control.
 
  • #3
jack action
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I don't have wifi. I'm connected to the world only from a cable plugged into my PC. I recently bought a smart phone (mostly for the camera), hoping to connect to the internet via my PC. I'm not sure I've done the right set up or use the right equipment to do so, though.
 
  • #4
russ_watters
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The way you described it is confusing. Are you saying the phone's connection to the PC is unstable or the PC loses its internet connection when the phone connects to it?
 
  • #5
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When the phone connects to the wifi signal from the PC, the PC connection drops, thus no more signal available. You then have to 'reconnect' the wifi hotspot on the PC, which will drop again as soon as the phone is turned on around the PC.
 
  • #6
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Are you expecting the PC's Wifi to provide both the link to your phone and its own link to the internet? That won't work.
 
  • #7
jack action
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The PC is already connected to the Internet via:

Code:
Device-1: Realtek RTL8111/8168/8411 PCI Express Gigabit Ethernet
  driver: r8169
  IF: enp37s0 state: up speed: 100 Mbps duplex: full mac: 30:9c:23:d6:6c:6b

I'm hoping the phone will connect to the internet through the following device (the one in the picture above), via wifi:

Code:
Device-2: Realtek 802.11n type: USB driver: rtl8188fu
  IF: wlx1cbfceea0202 state: down mac: 1c:bf:ce:ea:02:02
 
  • #8
anorlunda
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Sorry, I misread your question.


I can activate the connection successfully, but as soon as I turn the phone on and it tries to connect to the wifi signal, the PC connection drops.
  1. Clarify PC connection. The PC acting as a hotspot, or the PC's connection to the Ethernet cable connection to the Internet.
  2. Have you tried any devices other than your phone to connect to the hotspot wifi?
  3. The link you provided https://www.bestbuy.ca/en-ca/produc...adapter-802-11n-gb-dongle-windows-10/14931641 never mentions the word hotspot. I think it is designed to connect your PC to a WiFi signal, making your cable unneeded. Usually, that dongle is not needed because the laptop PC has WiFi on the motherboard.
 
  • #9
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  1. Clarify PC connection. The PC acting as a hotspot, or the PC's connection to the Ethernet cable connection to the Internet.
The PC acting as a hotspot.
  1. Have you tried any devices other than your phone to connect to the hotspot wifi?
No, I don't have any. (Never needed wifi before.) But sometimes the hotspot disconnects by itself (without the phone on nearby), and I think it is from machines in my neighborhood trying to connect to my signal.
  1. The link you provided https://www.bestbuy.ca/en-ca/produc...adapter-802-11n-gb-dongle-windows-10/14931641 never mentions the word hotspot. I think it is designed to connect your PC to a WiFi signal, making your cable unneeded. Usually, that dongle is not needed because the laptop PC has WiFi on the motherboard.
No it doesn't and I'm not sure it is the appropriate device for what I want to do. I'm open to suggestions for a better set up.

That being said, the phone does connect to my signal and download a few notifications from apps, just for the few seconds it can stay on in the right conditions (usually when booting the PC - connecting the networks automatically - while the phone is close by, already on).
 
  • #10
anorlunda
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Have you followed these instructions?

https://support.microsoft.com/en-us...-hotspot-c89b0fad-72d5-41e8-f7ea-406ad9036b85
Turn your Windows 10 PC into a mobile hotspot by sharing your Internet connection with other devices over Wi-Fi. You can share a Wi-Fi, Ethernet, or cellular data connection. If your PC has a cellular data connection and you share it, it will use data from your data plan.

  1. Select the Start button, then select Settings > Network & Internet > Mobile hotspot.
  2. For Share my Internet connection from, choose the Internet connection you want to share.
  3. Select Edit > enter a new network name and password > Save.
  4. Turn on Share my Internet connection with other devices.
  5. To connect on the other device, go to the Wi-Fi settings on that device, find your network name, select it, enter the password, and then connect.
 
  • #11
jack action
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I have Linux, but I did the equivalent, as stated in my OP:
I created a wifi connection with a method similar to this one. (The IPv4 & IPv6 settings are set to 'shared to other computers')
 
  • #12
pbuk
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What could be the problem? The driver? The hardware itself? Wrong set-up?
Yep, could be any one (or more) of those, plus any number of other things. These things can be tricky to set up even with official drivers (which are often only available for Windows), branded hardware (instead of some no-name junk, no offence intended) and when you know what you are doing (again no offence intended).

Assuming your ISP allows it, the best way to go would be to replace whatever it is on the other end of your ethernet cable with a WiFi router and connect your phone (as well as your PC) to that. Throw away the cheap dongle.

If your ISP doesn't allow it, it may well be that they don't allow hot-spotting either and are doing something to prevent it.
 
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  • #13
Svein
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I suspect something like this:
  • Your ISP provides you with a connection to the Internet. This also means that they are assigning an IP address to tour computer.
  • When you try to create a "hotspot" - if you do not install a router with NAT or PAT translation - you are in effect allowing other devices to use your IP address. This is definitely not allowed.
  • Since your "hotspot" is created in your PC, the PC needs its own IP address to work. If your phone tries to use the same IP - crash!
I strongly advice you to invest in a router with
  • Wi-Fi connection
  • NAT translation
  • and a DHCP server
The default setup of such a router is usually sufficient.
 
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  • #14
pbuk
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  • When you try to create a "hotspot" - if you do not install a router with NAT or PAT translation - you are in effect allowing other devices to use your IP address. This is definitely not allowed.
Hotspot mode includes a DHCP server and NAT...

I strongly advice you to invest in a router with
  • Wi-Fi connection
  • NAT translation
  • and a DHCP server
The default setup of such a router is usually sufficient.
...but yes, you would still be better off with a WiFi router as long as your ISP permits this.
 
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  • #15
Svein
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Hotspot mode includes a DHCP server and NAT...
Then it is a question of configuring the setup. The PC will act as a router, the phone has to get an IP address from the DHCP server (Not the same IP address as the IP address of the PC!) and use that IP address. The internal DHCP server must be configured to use one of the private address spaces (usually 192.168.1.nnn).
 
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  • #16
pbuk
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Then it is a question of configuring the setup. The PC will act as a router, the phone has to get an IP address from the DHCP server (Not the same IP address as the IP address of the PC!) and use that IP address. The internal DHCP server must be configured to use one of the private address spaces (usually 192.168.1.nnn).
Yes, all this is handled transparently by negotiation between the hotspot (or 'wireless access point') driver and the connecting device.
 
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  • #17
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I have to say that the situation is very confusing to people who are not there. "The PC" is a device on (at least) two networks, so all references to losing connections are ambiguous. It sounds like the WiFi connection is made and then dropped.

I would start by seeing what IP addresses are assigned. I don't think that will solve the problem, but it might be a place to start.

To be honest, debugging with a phone will be very difficult.
 
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  • #18
jack action
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Thank you all for your responses, they are helpful.

I never used wifi before. I thought I needed a router or a card, and then I found out that there were these other antennas. Not a lot of info technically about any of these devices (what do you look for in a router?), so it is hard to determine what they do and don't do.

As for the small device I have right now, I figured the price was so low that it was worth trying it. But I'm not married to it.

I don't think my provider doesn't allow wifi, it's a very well-established provider in the region and I can't imagine people cannot connect their ipads, phones, etc. on their local network when at home.
 
Last edited:
  • #19
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So what IP address does the phone get. Can you even tell?

How does data go from the 10.42 net to the real network?
 
  • #20
jack action
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Let me make it easier for all of you.

I have this phone (Sony Xperia, Android) with no SIM card, that I want to connect my PC (Linux, see OP for details) via wifi, such that I can connect it to the Internet via my home network. I connected to wifi once at someone else's house, how did that happen? What do I need? If you go on this bestbuy site, what do I need from them? I don't need fast, I don't need range, I need cheap.

By the way, if I could do it with a cable, I would. But it seems phones don't allow that.

So what IP address does the phone get. Can you even tell?

How does data go from the 10.42 net to the real network?
My knowledge is very limited in the wifi protocol and everything sounds like an alphabet soup when I hear about it. If you want to have some info about either of my machines, give me the command and I will execute it.
 
  • #21
pbuk
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If your contract with the ISP is for one device only and it starts seeing additional network packets with an Android fingerprint then it may well drop those packets, severing the connection. This is consistent with your reported symptoms: sometimes the connection is up and data comes through for a short time only, and then (once the ISP has spotted that you are using their network to do something you are not paying them for), the connection drops.

If there was some problem with DHCP, NAT or anything else then it would be unlikely that any data would get through.

So before you spend time checking some complicated stuff, do the easy bit: look at your ISP's Ts and Cs.
 
  • #22
pbuk
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Oops, I wrote that last post a couple of hours ago but it only just seems to have been posted! I'll catch up now...
 
  • #23
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My knowledge is very limited in the wifi protocol and everything sounds like an alphabet soup when I hear about it.

I'm afraid this will make it hard. The normal way you want to do this is to buy a Wifi router that will do all this (and even so, might be blocked by your ISP if they don't like this use). You want to use knowledge to save you money, but you don't have the knowledge yourself, so you want to use ours. That's going to be harder. Then we're not with you so all communication has to go through this channel - we can't look over your shoulder. That's going to be harder still.

Microcenter has a Wifi router for $13. At some point you need to ask yourself how much trouble you want to save $13.
 
  • #24
pbuk
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As for the connections I have, here is the info (when both are working):
That is far too much information to put on a public forum, you should delete it.

You have a pretty good connection there - I'm getting a round trip time from here in the UK to your computer and back of 101-117ms.
I don't think my provider doesn't allow wifi, it's a very well-established provider in the region and I can't imagine people cannot connect their ipads, phones, etc. on their local network when at home.
They are probably using one of these. What do you plug your PC into?
 
  • #25
russ_watters
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I have this phone (Sony Xperia, Android) with no SIM card, that I want to connect my PC (Linux, see OP for details) via wifi, such that I can connect it to the Internet via my home network. I connected to wifi once at someone else's house, how did that happen? What do I need? If you go on this bestbuy site, what do I need from them? I don't need fast, I don't need range, I need cheap.
Wifi NAS routers are commodity devices. There's a bajillion out there and they all have basically the same core features. Here's the cheapest one I see at Best Buy ($31 US):
https://www.bestbuy.com/site/linksys-ac1000-dual-band-wi-fi-5-router/6378613.p?skuId=6378613

But they are such commodity devices that odds are if you have a techie friend they may have an old one lying around that they kept "just in case" that they are willing to give you for cheap or free.

BTW; are you paying your ISP to rent your modem? Odds are you can buy one that includes modem and wifi/NAS router capability to replace it and save money (if your ISP allows).
 
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