Magnetic charge,matter and anti matter

In summary, the conversation discusses the concept of anti-matter and its definition in quantum field theory. It is mentioned that anti-matter is not based on one specific quality, but rather on the matching of creation and annihilation operators. The possibility of matter and anti-matter based on magnetic charge is also brought up, with the suggestion that they would be indistinguishable in both forward and backward time. The question of how matter and anti-matter based on magnetic charge would differ from those based on electric charge is also posed.
  • #1
spidey
213
0
I got a thought on this strange hypothetical question. We differentiate between matter and anti matter based on electric charge. if electron has -ve charge,then its anti matter positron has +ve charge. Supposing if there are particles having magnetic charge then

1. Will we have matter and anti matter based on magnetic charge also?
If the above question has positive answer then,
2. How they are different from matter and anti matter based on electric charge?
3. what will happen if matter and anti matter based on magnetic charge meets?
3. what will happen if the combination of matter and antimatter based on electric and magnetic charge meets?
 
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  • #2
Hi spidey! :smile:

Anti-ness isn't based on one specific quality (such as charge) …

the anti-particle of any particular particle is defined so that the creation operator of the particle "matches" the annihilation operator of the anti-particle (and vice-versa) …

so (in qft field definitions and particularly in Feynman diagrams) a particle going forward in time is indistinguishable form its anti-particle going backward in time.

So all you need to do is to work out what a magnetic charge going backward in time would look like (if you thought it was going forward). :wink:
 
  • #3
tiny-tim said:
Hi spidey! :smile:

Anti-ness isn't based on one specific quality (such as charge) …

the anti-particle of any particular particle is defined so that the creation operator of the particle "matches" the annihilation operator of the anti-particle (and vice-versa) …

so (in qft field definitions and particularly in Feynman diagrams) a particle going forward in time is indistinguishable form its anti-particle going backward in time.

So all you need to do is to work out what a magnetic charge going backward in time would look like (if you thought it was going forward). :wink:

Thanks Tiny tim..

I thought only electric charge differentiates between matter and anti matter. I even don't know how magnetic charge going forward would look like. But, by symmetry, magnetic charge going forward in time should also be indistinguishable from magnetic charge going backward in time. my question has no meaning unless there exist magnetic charge.
 

Related to Magnetic charge,matter and anti matter

1. What is magnetic charge?

Magnetic charge, also known as magnetic monopole, is a hypothetical elementary particle that carries a single magnetic pole. Unlike electric charges, which come in positive and negative forms, magnetic charges are theorized to exist as individual particles with either a north or south magnetic pole.

2. How is matter affected by magnetic fields?

Matter, which is made up of atoms, contains both positively and negatively charged particles (protons and electrons). When placed in a magnetic field, these charged particles experience a force and can move in a circular path. The direction of the force depends on the direction of the magnetic field and the charge of the particle.

3. What is anti-matter?

Anti-matter is a type of matter made up of particles that have the same mass as regular matter, but with opposite charge. For example, an anti-electron (called a positron) has the same mass as an electron, but a positive charge instead of negative. When matter and anti-matter particles come into contact, they annihilate each other, releasing a large amount of energy.

4. Can magnetic fields affect anti-matter?

Yes, magnetic fields can also affect anti-matter particles in the same way they affect regular matter. However, since anti-matter particles have opposite charge, they will move in the opposite direction in a magnetic field compared to regular matter particles.

5. What is the relationship between magnetic charge and anti-matter?

There is currently no known relationship between magnetic charge and anti-matter. While some theories suggest that magnetic monopoles could be a form of anti-matter, there is no evidence to support this. Additionally, anti-matter particles do not possess magnetic charge, as they have the same mass and opposite charge as regular matter particles.

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