Magnetism and atomic structure

In summary, atomic structure does exhibit the effects of magnetic interactions, such as spin-orbit coupling and the magnetic hyperfine interaction. While it may not be necessary for the existence of atoms, it does play a role in their structure and behavior.
  • #1

coolul007

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Does atomic structure require a magnetic force? I understand that in the world of people it is most appreciated, however, it doesn't seem to have a purpose in the atomic structure.
 
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  • #2
I am not sure what you mean by "require". However, it is true that atomic structure exhibits the effects of magnetic interactions which imply the existence of magnetic forces within an atom. Some examples of these are spin-orbit coupling and the magnetic hyperfine interaction.
 
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  • #3
I mean does the absence of the magnet force effect the atomic/chemical structure. Would atoms exist without it? It seems to be a product of other forces(if that's the correct term)
 

1. What is magnetism?

Magnetism is the force of attraction or repulsion between objects that results from the motion of electric charges. It is caused by the alignment of magnetic dipoles within a material, which can be induced by an external magnetic field.

2. How do magnets work?

Magnets work by creating a magnetic field around them, which exerts a force on other magnetic materials. This force is strongest at the poles of the magnet, where the magnetic field lines are most concentrated. Opposite poles attract each other, while like poles repel.

3. What is the atomic structure of a magnet?

A magnet is made up of tiny particles called atoms, which have their own individual magnetic fields. Within an atom, there are positively charged protons, negatively charged electrons, and neutral neutrons. The alignment of these particles creates a magnetic field.

4. How is magnetism related to electricity?

Magnetism and electricity are closely related as they are both forms of electromagnetism. Moving electric charges (such as electrons) create magnetic fields, and changing magnetic fields can induce electric currents. This is known as electromagnetic induction.

5. How does temperature affect magnetism?

The temperature of a material can affect its magnetism. In general, as the temperature increases, the strength of a magnet decreases. This is because heat disrupts the alignment of magnetic dipoles within the material, making it less magnetic. This effect is known as the Curie temperature.

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