Math symbols formatting

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In summary, to type superscript text and subscript text without using symbols like 2^2 or 2[ sup ]2[ /sup ], you can use the &name format characters, such as [ inte ] for integral, [ squ ] for square root, and [ del ] for delta. You can also access a variety of math symbols by clicking the "Get More" link under the smiley box when posting a reply. Additionally, you can hold down the alt key and enter numbers on the number pad to create symbols like multiplication (×) and division (÷). There is also a comprehensive documentation of all the characters that can be created using the &name format.
  • #1
how do you type superscript Text and subscript Text, not using the symbols like 2^2 ?
 
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  • #2
2[ sup ]2[ /sup ], but without the spaces (sub for subscripts), see: 22, 22
 
  • #3
testing
32
33

got it, thx
 
  • #4
Nice!

But what about the integration and differentiation signs? and the rest of these signs too, if possible.

hhegab
 
  • #5
Whenever you post a reply, you will see a box containing some "smilies" on the left.
Under this box, there is a link saying "Get More".
Click it.
A new window will pop up, you will find lot of math symbols there.
Examples (dont' forget to delete the spaces between [ ] )
[ inte ] [inte]
[ squ ] [squ]
[ del ] [del]
And others ...
 
  • #6


Originally posted by hhegab
But what about the integration and differentiation signs? and the rest of these signs too, if possible.

hhegab

https://www.physicsforums.com/announcement.php?s=&forumid=4 [Broken]
 
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  • #7
It seems all greek letters can be written in the & name (no space in-between) format. However, your choice of font will affect how nice the letters look. Here's the lower case greek alphabet in times new roman:


&alpha&beta&gamma&delta&epsilon&zeta&eta&theta&iota&kappa&lambda&mu&nu&pi&omicron&xi&rho&sigma&tau&upsilon&phi&chi&psi&omega


You can always fall back on windows-style specification of symbols. For instance, if you hold down the alt-key and enter numbers on the number pad, you can get:

× alt-0215
÷ alt-0247



I would be entirely unsurprised if there's pre-existing documentation of all of the characters one can create via the "& name" format, but I don't know where it is.

Hurkyl
 
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  • #8
Originally posted by Hurkyl
I would be entirely unsurprised if there's pre-existing documentation of all of the characters one can create via the "& name" format, but I don't know where it is.

Hurkyl

Some one posted a link to a pretty exhaustive site documenting the &name format characters. The link is in the feedback forum in a topic called math symbols or something, its near the bottom and is really good.
 

1. What are the most commonly used math symbols in formatting?

The most commonly used math symbols in formatting are: + (addition), - (subtraction), * (multiplication), / (division), = (equality), < (less than), > (greater than), ^ (exponent), and √ (square root).

2. How do I use superscripts and subscripts in math formatting?

To use superscripts and subscripts in math formatting, you can use the superscript and subscript tags in HTML, or the ^ and _ symbols in LaTeX. For example, 23 would be written as 23 in HTML or 2^3 in LaTeX.

3. What is the difference between a variable and a constant in math formatting?

A variable is a symbol that represents a quantity that can vary or change in a mathematical expression, while a constant is a fixed value that does not change. Variables are typically represented by letters, while constants are represented by numbers or symbols.

4. How do I insert special characters in math formatting?

To insert special characters in math formatting, you can use the &#code; format in HTML. For example, the code for the Greek letter alpha (α) is &#945;. You can also use LaTeX notation, such as \alpha, to insert special characters.

5. How can I ensure that my math symbols are properly formatted in different browsers?

To ensure that your math symbols are properly formatted in different browsers, it is recommended to use HTML entities or LaTeX notation instead of specific characters, as different browsers may render characters differently. You can also use a math formatting library, such as MathJax, to ensure consistent rendering across browsers.

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