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Meassuring Resistance under water?

  1. Apr 20, 2010 #1
    Hey,

    So as part of a experiment I am curious to be able to measure the resistance of a wire as I joule heat it under water to be able to get a steady state temp vs current. My thought is to attach electrodes to a metal wire to put a current across it and measure a voltage drop(4 point probe). I would likely use insulated leads attached to the wire that i want to measure. Additionally I would put the wire in distilled water when I make the measurements. So my thought is that since the resistance of the water is so much greater than that of the water I should be able to get a relatively accurate measurements. Does this make sense or am I missing something.

    Thanks
    Matt
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 21, 2010 #2

    berkeman

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    Staff: Mentor

    Makes perfect sense, except for the simple typo in your next to last sentence. You should be fine.
     
  4. Apr 21, 2010 #3
    sense instead of since? not the first time and I actually meant to type it that way.
    Thanks
    Matt
     
  5. Apr 21, 2010 #4

    Mech_Engineer

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    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Your typo was saying that you plan to compare the resistance of the water to the water (itself).
     
  6. Apr 21, 2010 #5

    berkeman

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    Staff: Mentor

    Yeah, change the 2nd water --> resistor.
     
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