Mobile network or internet on Long-Fi?

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I have a question if it would be possible to have a cellular network on Long-Fi? I have tried searching for information on the theoretical maximum bandwidth of Long-Fi; but, can't find anything. I also am unsure if the idea would be of interest to companies like Tesla to set up a hub connecting to Starlink backbone, and having it operate instead of on the cellular backbone and paying high fees for connectivity. Obstacles would be something like miniaturization of the modem of receiver for a cell phone; but, seemingly for a car it wouldn't be much of a problem.

There are companies like Helium Hotspot that offer such technology for their network; but, have some strange applications to mining bitcoin which make the cost bloated for companies like Tesla to buy them out if possible. As far as I know, Helium Hotspot offers 5 kb/s :(, which would prevent it from commercial internet or mobile use. Does anyone know the theoretical maximum of bandwidth for Long-Fi?

Could someone enlighten me if it makes sense to utilize it for internet or cellular service with the above ambiguities clarified if possible.

Thanks.
 

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  • #3
f95toli
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I think it is impossible to determine a "theoretical maximum". Any real-life protocol will be compromise not only because of the underlying physics/engineering but also because you are always restricted to a small part of the available spectrum for licensing reasons . Hence, whereas it might be physically possible to increase the data rate I suspect you need to go outside the license exempt band to see a significant increase in speed.
I believe this is one reason for why there is now a drive to use much higher frequencies where the spectrum is less crowded, the downside is that the range is typically lower for higher frequencies.
 
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collinsmark
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In the simplest terms, the data rate for LoRaWAN (the modulation scheme for LongFi) is from 0.3 kpbs to 27 kbps. But don't expect anywhere near an average 27 kbps per user on a loaded network. Here's a Wikipedia article on it:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LoRa

Here's a more scholarly article from arxiv.org (a link to a PDF document). I believe this article was later published in IEEE Communications Magazine (Volume: 55, Issue: 9, Sept. 2017), but there's a paywall for the final article. So here's the arxiv.org version, without the paywall: Understanding the Limits of LoRaWAN.

It sounds like it would be a good idea for such things as agricultural monitoring (e.g., monitoring an array of devices that measure soil moisture content), utility metering, smart parking, transportation logistics, and other low data rate applications. I'm not sure if it's up for the task of supporting voice, even with high, vocoder compression (I doubt it is). Video surveillance is right out.
 
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In the simplest terms, the data rate for LoRaWAN (the modulation scheme for LongFi) is from 0.3 kpbs to 27 kbps. But don't expect anywhere near an average 27 kbps per user on a loaded network. Here's a Wikipedia article on it:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LoRa

Here's a more scholarly article from arxiv.org (a link to a PDF document). I believe this article was later published in IEEE Communications Magazine (Volume: 55, Issue: 9, Sept. 2017), but there's a paywall for the final article. So here's the arxiv.org version, without the paywall: Understanding the Limits of LoRaWAN.
There's also DASH7?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DASH7
 

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