Mobile network or internet on Long-Fi?

In summary, the conversation discusses the possibility of utilizing Long-Fi for cellular service and the theoretical maximum bandwidth of Long-Fi. The conversation also mentions obstacles such as miniaturization and licensing restrictions. The data rate for LoRaWAN, the modulation scheme for LongFi, is also mentioned to be from 0.3 kbps to 27 kbps. The conversation concludes with mentioning other alternatives such as DASH7.
  • #1
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I have a question if it would be possible to have a cellular network on Long-Fi? I have tried searching for information on the theoretical maximum bandwidth of Long-Fi; but, can't find anything. I also am unsure if the idea would be of interest to companies like Tesla to set up a hub connecting to Starlink backbone, and having it operate instead of on the cellular backbone and paying high fees for connectivity. Obstacles would be something like miniaturization of the modem of receiver for a cell phone; but, seemingly for a car it wouldn't be much of a problem.

There are companies like Helium Hotspot that offer such technology for their network; but, have some strange applications to mining bitcoin which make the cost bloated for companies like Tesla to buy them out if possible. As far as I know, Helium Hotspot offers 5 kb/s :(, which would prevent it from commercial internet or mobile use. Does anyone know the theoretical maximum of bandwidth for Long-Fi?

Could someone enlighten me if it makes sense to utilize it for internet or cellular service with the above ambiguities clarified if possible.

Thanks.
 
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  • #3
I think it is impossible to determine a "theoretical maximum". Any real-life protocol will be compromise not only because of the underlying physics/engineering but also because you are always restricted to a small part of the available spectrum for licensing reasons . Hence, whereas it might be physically possible to increase the data rate I suspect you need to go outside the license exempt band to see a significant increase in speed.
I believe this is one reason for why there is now a drive to use much higher frequencies where the spectrum is less crowded, the downside is that the range is typically lower for higher frequencies.
 
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  • #4
In the simplest terms, the data rate for LoRaWAN (the modulation scheme for LongFi) is from 0.3 kpbs to 27 kbps. But don't expect anywhere near an average 27 kbps per user on a loaded network. Here's a Wikipedia article on it:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LoRa

Here's a more scholarly article from arxiv.org (a link to a PDF document). I believe this article was later published in IEEE Communications Magazine (Volume: 55, Issue: 9, Sept. 2017), but there's a paywall for the final article. So here's the arxiv.org version, without the paywall: Understanding the Limits of LoRaWAN.

It sounds like it would be a good idea for such things as agricultural monitoring (e.g., monitoring an array of devices that measure soil moisture content), utility metering, smart parking, transportation logistics, and other low data rate applications. I'm not sure if it's up for the task of supporting voice, even with high, vocoder compression (I doubt it is). Video surveillance is right out.
 
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  • #5
collinsmark said:
In the simplest terms, the data rate for LoRaWAN (the modulation scheme for LongFi) is from 0.3 kpbs to 27 kbps. But don't expect anywhere near an average 27 kbps per user on a loaded network. Here's a Wikipedia article on it:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LoRa

Here's a more scholarly article from arxiv.org (a link to a PDF document). I believe this article was later published in IEEE Communications Magazine (Volume: 55, Issue: 9, Sept. 2017), but there's a paywall for the final article. So here's the arxiv.org version, without the paywall: Understanding the Limits of LoRaWAN.
There's also DASH7?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DASH7
 
  • #6

1. How does Long-Fi differ from traditional cellular networks?

Long-Fi is a new type of wireless network that uses low-power, wide-area (LPWA) technology to connect devices to the internet. Unlike traditional cellular networks, Long-Fi does not rely on high-frequency radio waves, but instead uses low-frequency signals that can travel longer distances and penetrate buildings more easily. This makes it ideal for connecting devices in remote or underground locations.

2. What are the advantages of using Long-Fi for mobile network or internet connectivity?

There are several advantages to using Long-Fi for mobile network or internet connectivity. First, it has a longer range than traditional cellular networks, meaning that it can cover larger areas with fewer base stations. Second, it uses less power, making it more energy-efficient and cost-effective. Finally, it has lower latency, meaning that there is less delay in data transfer, making it ideal for applications such as real-time monitoring or remote control.

3. How does Long-Fi ensure security and privacy for devices connected to the network?

Long-Fi uses advanced encryption techniques to ensure the security and privacy of devices connected to the network. This means that all data transmitted over Long-Fi is encrypted, making it difficult for hackers to intercept or manipulate. Additionally, Long-Fi has built-in security features such as device authentication and secure data transfer protocols to further protect against cyber threats.

4. What types of devices can be connected to a Long-Fi network?

Long-Fi is designed to connect a wide range of devices, including smartphones, tablets, laptops, sensors, and other Internet of Things (IoT) devices. As long as the device has a Long-Fi radio module, it can connect to the network and access the internet or other cloud-based services.

5. Is Long-Fi available everywhere and how is it being implemented?

Long-Fi is still a relatively new technology and is currently being implemented in select locations around the world. However, as it gains popularity and more companies adopt it, we can expect to see Long-Fi coverage expand to more areas. Some cities and companies are already using Long-Fi to connect devices for smart city initiatives, environmental monitoring, and industrial automation. It is also being used to provide internet connectivity in rural and remote areas where traditional cellular networks are not available.

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