Molar heat capacity for an ideal monoatomic gas

In summary, the molar heat capacity for an ideal monoatomic gas is the amount of heat energy required to raise the temperature of one mole of gas by one degree Kelvin (or Celsius) at constant volume. It is denoted by the symbol Cv and has a value of 3R/2. This type of heat capacity differs from others because it only considers the internal energy of the gas molecules and not their motion or rotation. For an ideal monoatomic gas, the molar heat capacity remains constant regardless of temperature. Compared to real gases, the molar heat capacity of an ideal monoatomic gas is lower due to the lack of additional degrees of freedom. Factors such as the number of gas molecules, type of gas, temperature, and
  • #1
A monatomic ideal gas undergoes a process in which the ratio of P to V at any instant is constant and equals to 1.

What is the molar heat capacity of the gas?
(A) 4R/2
(B) 3R/2
(C) 5R/2
(D) 0
 
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  • #2
A two dimensional monoatomic gas of N particle ocupying an area A has its partition function given by
z=A^n/n!h^2n(360ktm)^n.
Obtain the equation of state, heat capacity and the entropy
 
  • #3
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1. What is molar heat capacity for an ideal monoatomic gas?

The molar heat capacity for an ideal monoatomic gas is the amount of heat energy required to raise the temperature of one mole of gas by one degree Kelvin (or Celsius) at constant volume. It is denoted by the symbol Cv and has a value of 3R/2, where R is the gas constant.

2. How is molar heat capacity for an ideal monoatomic gas different from other types of heat capacity?

Molar heat capacity for an ideal monoatomic gas differs from other types of heat capacity because it only takes into account the internal energy of the gas molecules. This means that it does not include any energy associated with the motion or rotation of the gas molecules.

3. What is the relationship between molar heat capacity and temperature for an ideal monoatomic gas?

For an ideal monoatomic gas, the molar heat capacity is independent of temperature. This means that the amount of heat energy required to raise the temperature of the gas by one degree remains constant, regardless of the initial temperature of the gas.

4. How does the molar heat capacity of an ideal monoatomic gas compare to that of a real gas?

The molar heat capacity of an ideal monoatomic gas is generally lower than that of a real gas. This is because real gases have additional degrees of freedom, such as molecular rotation and vibration, which require additional energy to raise their temperature.

5. What factors affect the molar heat capacity of an ideal monoatomic gas?

The molar heat capacity of an ideal monoatomic gas is affected by the number of gas molecules present, the type of gas, and the temperature. It is also dependent on the type of process (constant volume or constant pressure) and the presence of any external energy sources, such as heat transfer or work done on the gas.

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