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Mother who forgot her child was in car

  1. May 4, 2012 #1

    Evo

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    Unbelieveable, this woman forgot she had a child. Instead of dropping her child off at daycare before going to work, she just drove to work, completely forgeting about the child. Who on earth forgets that they have a child? The child died inside in the car with inside temperatures reaching over 120F.

    Instead of arresting the woman, since she's from a good background
    Read more: http://www.kmbc.com/news/31010820/detail.html#ixzz1txOVDAtp [Broken]

    At the same time a poor woman called 911 saying she couldn't find her child, which was found a couple of blocks away safe in it's stroller where she had forgotten him. She was arrested. Her child is fine.

    http://www.kansascity.com/2012/05/04/3593905/mother-charged-after-infant-found.html [Broken]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 6, 2017
  2. jcsd
  3. May 4, 2012 #2
    what such a poor child.
     
  4. May 4, 2012 #3

    Office_Shredder

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    "
    The mother is believed to have been under the influence of drugs at the time of the baby’s disappearance, Major Dan Nicodemus said."

    Assuming this is true your summary of the situation is a bit of a white wash.

    On the other hand if there's a one in 10 billion chance of you forgetting your kid in the car on a given day, then you expect to see this kind of thing happen once every couple of years (25 million children 0-5 http://www.childstats.gov/americaschildren/tables/pop1.asp, 365 days in a year).
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 6, 2017
  5. May 5, 2012 #4
    I don't think the mother left the child in the car to die on purpose.Assuming this is the case it makes sense that the mother shouldn't be punished.
    Though legally the idea not to punish people who did a crime not on purpose is slippery, because criminals will try to avoid punishment by saying they didn't intended to do what they did.so
    Practical solution is to check if they are telling truth.Though in the situation of the mother I think there are better ways to kill a child than to leave it in a car ;D
     
  6. May 5, 2012 #5
    Appalling.

    That was really unfortunate. This is not something trivial. People need to realise that mistakes like these can cost someone's life.
     
  7. May 5, 2012 #6

    Ryan_m_b

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    I honestly don't understand how people can forget about other people they are driving, especially ones in their care. In addendum to a mother and child witness a care worker and an Alzhiemer's patient
     
  8. May 5, 2012 #7

    lisab

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    Sounds like the bus driver may have a touch of dementia...?
     
  9. May 5, 2012 #8
    It's like those people who forget they're pumping gas and drive off with the pump still in their car. I don't understand that.
     
  10. May 5, 2012 #9

    cepheid

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    I disagree. That's why we have charges such as:

    - criminal *negligence* causing death

    - manslaughter

    Who says that the killing has to be intentional? If your actions lead to the death of another human being, then you should face some consequences. Otherwise society would just be condoning this sort of egregious lack of responsibility from everyone.
     
  11. May 5, 2012 #10
    I wouldn't say she's not facing any consequences. She lost her child. Is that not punishment enough?
     
  12. May 5, 2012 #11

    Monique

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    Well, I once forgot about a colleague who was locked out of the building. He called me if I could open the door, I said "yes, one minute". I never opened the door. He didn't die, but still I felt incredibly guilty. I agree with leroyjenkens: she's been punished enough. The situation would be different if she deliberately left the kid in the car.
     
  13. May 5, 2012 #12
    See? There is a difference. The boy died.
     
  14. May 5, 2012 #13

    cepheid

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    It's criminal negligence. There's a reason such a crime exists. I think that she needs to held legally responsible for her actions. Do you really think that I am being too harsh?

    I did not say that the sentence had to be severe. I understand that she is already suffering the psychological trauma and guilt from having inadvertently killed her own child.
     
  15. May 5, 2012 #14
    Also, to add to what R.P.F. said, you're not responsible for what happens to your colleague, whereas a parent has total responsibility for their young child.
     
  16. May 5, 2012 #15

    Monique

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    You didn't get the point, forgetting about a child and leaving it unattended would have resulted in immense guilt already. I don't know how a parent can live, knowing that one is responsible for serious injury, or even death of a child.
     
  17. May 5, 2012 #16
    Perhaps the fact that she was suspected of being under the influence of drugs was a large factor in that fact that she was arrested? I find it rather puzzling that you would omit such a detail.
     
  18. May 5, 2012 #17
    Oh, how I wish guilt could just pay for everything. :yuck:
     
  19. May 5, 2012 #18

    Pythagorean

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    Yes. Is there any productive outcome of your method of handling the situation? I don't think so! If it would have been on purpose, you could have argued that you would be discouraging people from intentionally leaving their kids in the car for long hours (this would still be negligence if the mother wasn't trying to kill their kid.)

    On the other hand, if she completely forgot, you're not going to discourage others from forgetting by making an example of this one (it's not something we consciously consider doing).

    So, what's the point then? Retribution? "Justice?"
     
  20. May 5, 2012 #19

    BobG

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    If there's more than one person hanging around outside the car, then that's something that's easy to do. We did that once on a TDY with about 5 of us hanging around the gas pump. We're all thinking that surely at least one of the other four people took the nozzle out!

    And a friend and I did that with the lug nuts on my car, which was quite a bit more upsetting. Funny, I've never made that mistake again. In fact, I helped my son change his tire and wound up calling him after I got home to make sure he tightened the lug nuts, because I didn't check them when we were done.
     
  21. May 5, 2012 #20

    Monique

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    Exactly, I was going to say the same.
     
  22. May 5, 2012 #21

    cepheid

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    Yes, justice. As R.P.F said, unlike you with your colleague, a parent is legally responsible for his/her child. These laws exist to protect children from incompetent and/or uncaring parents!

    How do you know that this mom is fraught with guilt over what happened? If she cared for her child, how could she allow this to happen in the first place? It's unthinkable! For a parent to be so absorbed with her own work and her own life that her child is not first and foremost in her thoughts is a rarity. At best, it suggests that she is not yet ready for and fully committed to the responsibility of parenthood. Slightly worse, it could be that she is a callous person. At worst, she could be some sort of sociopath.

    Sure, I am making assumptions about her mental state. But so are you. I don't buy Pythagorean's argument above that having serious consequences for such egregiously bad parenting doesn't act as a deterrent to others. He argued that you don't make a conscious decision to forget to take your child out of the car -- by definition it is an accident. Sure, but it is a really really hard thing to forget *unless* if you are already a really careless and inattentive parent to begin with. Having this woman face consequences in the justice system should act as a wake up call to all such lackadaisical parents out there.

    I consider myself a liberal. I'm not some sort of right-wing conservative who believes that we need to be "tough on crime." I know that that doesn't work. I just think that society should enforce the standard that such carelessness in something as important as looking after a human life is unacceptable.
     
  23. May 5, 2012 #22

    Evo

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    She immediately remembered upon returning home and called 911. Her child wasn't even harmed, yet she was arrested and had her children taken away. How many parents smoke marijuana? How do we know that the woman that killed her son wasn't high? Except it was late in the day when she saw her dead son in the back of her car, so if she smoked a joint that morning, they wouldn't know. Or maybe she popped a couple of pain pills. It apears they did no drug tests on her. Or is she just too ditzy to be a competant parent? I can even see forgetting to stop at the day care, but how do you get out of your car without glancing at the car seat? That's so automatic in a parent.

    People are arrested and prosecuted for leaving children in cars, or forgetting they are in the bath tub, or that the back door wasn't locked and the kid wandered outside and fell in the pool. It's called negligent homicide.

    Heck it's against the law to leave an animal in a car in many states.
     
    Last edited: May 5, 2012
  24. May 5, 2012 #23

    Pythagorean

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    That's just not true...

    Catch up on the psychology of punishment in the last 40 years. Even when your directly accountable for intentional actions, punishment is not very effective. When it comes to "training" people not to forget with punishment, it's really a lost cause.

    Alos, you don't know how good or bad her parenting was outside of her one mistake that made national news. Apparently, her record was clean if that's any indication.
     
  25. May 5, 2012 #24

    Pythagorean

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    also, I've never forgotten my children so I'm not defending myself here, but their mother has moments where she'll be like "oh god, did I leave the car-seat (with baby) on the ground outside the car?" And of course she didn't, but she FORGETS having put the baby in. And she forgets a lot of things ever since having two children. It really changed her hormones and her biology a lot.
     
  26. May 5, 2012 #25

    Evo

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    To be honest, lack of a record just means she hasn't been caught doing anything wrong. I doubt she's a criminal, but I think they should have checked her for drugs.
     
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