Necessary and sufficient condition for an electron to radiat

In summary, the necessary and sufficient condition for an electron to radiate is when it interacts with another particle or field. There are several methods that can cause an electron to radiate, including acceleration, deceleration, and collisions with other particles. The level of understanding on this topic can vary, but it is typically at a graduate level for those who have studied it extensively.
  • #1
qnach
142
4
What is the necessary and sufficient condition for an electron to radiate?

How many methods to cause an electron to radiate?
 
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  • #2
qnach said:
What is the necessary and sufficient condition for an electron to radiate?

How many methods to cause an electron to radiate?

you labelled you thread Advanced, that means you should already have a good understanding of electrons and EM radiation
and the interactions

so what are your thoughts ?
what have you discovered in your studies ?
Is there something specific in some text that you didn't understand ?I suspect your thread should have been labelled, B for Basic ?Dave
 
  • #3
davenn said:
you labelled you thread Advanced, that means you should already have a good understanding of electrons and EM radiation
and the interactions

so what are your thoughts ?
what have you discovered in your studies ?
Is there something specific in some text that you didn't understand ?I suspect your thread should have been labelled, B for Basic ?Dave

I have asked many people in other forum, and in scientific journals, this BASIC question.
Those replied include academician.
Specifically, it is an estonia academician who is one of those who replied.
But none of them gave me clear answer.
Some even gave WRONG answer.
Specifically the academician gave a WRONG answer.
 
  • #4
none of what you responded with answered my Q's

so what is your level of understanding
A infers a graduate level BSc etc
just so others responding to the thread know how best to answer :smile:

so try again with your current understandings of the topic
 

Related to Necessary and sufficient condition for an electron to radiat

What is the necessary and sufficient condition for an electron to radiate?

The necessary and sufficient condition for an electron to radiate is when the electron undergoes an acceleration or deceleration. This acceleration or deceleration can be caused by an external force or by the electron interacting with other particles.

What is the difference between necessary and sufficient condition?

The necessary condition is a condition that must be met in order for a certain outcome to occur. In the case of an electron radiating, the necessary condition is the acceleration or deceleration of the electron. The sufficient condition is a condition that, when met, guarantees the outcome. In this case, the sufficient condition is the acceleration or deceleration of the electron.

Can an electron radiate without undergoing acceleration or deceleration?

No, an electron cannot radiate without undergoing acceleration or deceleration. This is because the emission of radiation is a result of energy being released by the electron as it changes its velocity, which can only happen with acceleration or deceleration.

What determines the frequency of the radiation emitted by an electron?

The frequency of the radiation emitted by an electron is determined by the amount of energy released by the electron during acceleration or deceleration. This is known as the energy-frequency relationship, where the higher the energy released, the higher the frequency of the radiation.

How does the environment affect the necessary and sufficient condition for an electron to radiate?

The environment can affect the necessary and sufficient condition for an electron to radiate by influencing the strength and direction of the external forces acting on the electron. This can impact the acceleration or deceleration of the electron and therefore affect its ability to radiate.

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