Need a Review of Solenoid Equations and their Derivation

In summary, The conversation discusses the review of solenoid equations, specifically for bar solenoids, toroidal solenoids, and toroidal solenoids with an air gap. Maxwell's equations can be used to derive the magnetic field for bar solenoids, while for toroidal solenoids, it becomes more complicated. However, if the major radius is much greater than the minor radius, the equation is similar to that of straight solenoids. The equation for inductance of a bar-shaped air-core solenoid is also mentioned, and for toroidal solenoids, the circumference of the torus can be used in place of "l". The conversation also mentions the issue of understanding once a magnetic core is
  • #1
Prince Rilian
24
1
I need a review of solenoid equations, such as equations for bar solenoids, toroidal solenoids, and toroidal solenoids with an air gap within them. I think that somewhere along the line I may have learned something incorrect, so I would like to kill any douts that I have by ascertaining myself of the correct equations.
 
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  • #2
the bar (straight) solenoid is the simplest. You can derive the magnetic field by using Maxwell's equations (in integral form). For the toroidal solenoid, I guess it is more complicated, unless the major radius is much greater than the minor radius, in which case I guess it would be approximately the same as in the case of the straight solenoid.
 
  • #3
I know that the equation for the inductance of a bar-shaped air-core solenoid is

L = μ0AN2/l,​

assuming that both of the dimensions of the area component are much less than the variable "l". For a toroidal solenoid, I know that you can use the same form of equation if you use the circumference of the torus in place of "l".

The problem in my understanding seems to come about once a magnetic core is inserted into the solenoid...
 

1. What is a solenoid?

A solenoid is a coil of wire that is wound in a helical shape. It is commonly used in electromagnets and electronic devices to generate a magnetic field.

2. What are the equations used to describe a solenoid?

The two main equations used to describe a solenoid are the Biot-Savart Law and Ampere's Law. The Biot-Savart Law calculates the magnetic field produced by a current-carrying wire, while Ampere's Law relates the magnetic field to the current flowing through a wire.

3. How is the magnetic field inside a solenoid calculated?

The magnetic field inside a solenoid can be calculated using the Biot-Savart Law. This law states that the magnetic field at a point is directly proportional to the current, the distance from the wire, and the sine of the angle between the current and the line connecting the point and the current.

4. What is the derivation of the solenoid equations?

The derivation of the solenoid equations involves using the principles of electromagnetism, such as Maxwell's equations, to describe the behavior of electric and magnetic fields in a solenoid. This includes considering the direction and magnitude of the current, as well as the geometry of the solenoid.

5. What are some applications of solenoids?

Solenoids have a wide range of applications in various fields, including in electronic devices, automotive systems, and industrial equipment. They are commonly used in valves, switches, relays, and motors, among others. They are also essential components in medical devices, such as MRI machines, which use strong magnetic fields to produce images of the body.

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