Need an odorless additive that can to turn liquid into solid

  • #1

Main Question or Discussion Point

I would like to know of any compound that I can use to add to a liquid that can turn it into a solid. I would like the liquid to be air drying and form a solid but slightly fragile structure. Almost semi-brittle, where if hit or crushed, small pieces of crystals would break off. Is there such a thing?

Edited- I am looking to solidify Urine. (don't want to go into details further)

Could i add sucrose and heat for this purpose?


Thank you guys!
 
Last edited:

Answers and Replies

  • #2
Vanadium 50
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Any liquid? Nope.
 
  • #3
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Sounds like gelatine.
It is a bit hard to keep it dry, but that's another story...
 
  • #4
Updated- Not any liquid, particularly urine. I need the urine to retain its original scent but be able to be solidified as described.
 
  • #5
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That's even harder to keep dry: especially since at the end everybody will try to mop it up/away.
But I think (freeze-dried) gelatine should work to a certain extent.
 
  • #6
jim mcnamara
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For hunting and photography deer pee and predator pee:
https://www.bonecollector.com/deer-scents-guide-deer-scents/
with some limited discussion.

If you gave us a clue about what you are really trying to do, there are lots of very helpful folks here.

Urine is pretty much the same thing as water with some salts added, and some other volatile scent components. Sort of dual purpose: territory marking, plus excretion of waste products - all in one package. If you have "patent" in the back of your mind, good luck.
 
  • #8
chemisttree
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Use plaster of paris or calcium sulfate hemihydrate. You will need to add 3X plaster to the weight of urine. Alternatively you could add anhydrous magnesium sulfate or finely divided sodium sulfate. The amounts of these last two are for you to determine. Sodium sulfate is less available than plaster but it does form the decahydrate so it should be fairly efficient. All the amines and sulfides will remain as a ppt on the surface of the nascent hydrate mineral and should be unaffected. The hydration reaction (drying) is fairly exothermic so it is best that it is done in thin layers rather than in bulk (like in a bucket).
 
  • #9
chemisttree
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Chemists use these compounds routinely to sequester water in their workups of chemical reactions, so they are very common, well-known and safe!

By the way, I usually get paid for solving problems like this for people just like you. Consider this a gift from the Forums and if this has been any help to you, please consider a membership to the site.
 
  • #10
Thank you all! @jim mcnamara patent is not on my mind but this patent listing does help! @chemisttree thank you very much and I will definitely be remembering the help of this forum in the future! thank you!
 

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