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Homework Help: Net Ionic Equations?

  1. Sep 22, 2010 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    So the question is:

    Enter the net ionic equation for the reaction of aqueous sodium chloride with aqueous silver nitrate.


    2. Relevant equations
    So i know that the first part of the equation is:
    Na(ClO2)aq+Ag(NO3)aq --> i have no clue what should go here.
    Please help

    3. The attempt at a solution
    and i dont ebern know how to attempt this problem.... i tried:
    Ag(aq) --> (ClO2)s
    because this is what would change but it is saying it is not right.
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data



    2. Relevant equations



    3. The attempt at a solution
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 22, 2010 #2

    Borek

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    Staff: Mentor

    NaClO2 is not sodium chloride.

    Start writing both compounds in ionic form, the way they dissociate in the solution. Don't ignore charges.

    --
     
  4. Sep 22, 2010 #3
    OH WAIT!!!! Sodium Chloride is just NaCl.

    So it would be:

    Na++Cl++Ag+NO3-
     
  5. Sep 22, 2010 #4

    Borek

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    Staff: Mentor

    Close, just add correct charge to Ag.

    Do you have any idea what can happen when you mix these salts? Hint: answer lies in the solubility rules.
     
  6. Sep 22, 2010 #5
    The Charge on Ag is a + right but my professor said something about in the Net ionic equation how all the reactents are not in it. so i was wondering how i would write the end equation.... would it be:

    Ag+(aq) --> Cl-(s) or something like that..
     
  7. Sep 22, 2010 #6

    Borek

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    Staff: Mentor

    Try to answer my question: what will happen in the solution?

    --
     
  8. Sep 22, 2010 #7
  9. Sep 23, 2010 #8

    Borek

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    Staff: Mentor

    Yes and no. You are right about AgCl precipitating from the solution and becoming solid, you are wrong about NO3- attaching to Na+ - they will just float in the solution, they aren't called spectators without a reason.

    Now you should be able to write full ionic equation and cancel out spectators.
     
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