Not Another, Gosh: Vanuatu hit by large quake

  • Thread starter StevieTNZ
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  • #2
ProfuselyQuarky
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Ugh . . . large magnitude earthquakes are becoming more and more common.
 
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As our detection technology gets better and as our population (and therefore technologists) become more numerous, it does seem as if things once uncommon are now appearing more frequently. However, a quick look at the stats usually dispels this feeling. And, of course, we do have flurries of activity at almost every level.
 
  • #4
ProfuselyQuarky
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True, but you don't need detection technology to notice a 7.0 magnitude earthquake :) Just sayin'.

I get what you're saying, though.
 
  • #5
davenn
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Ugh . . . large magnitude earthquakes are becoming more and more common.
no they are not ... the yearly averages haven't changed in the last 100 or so years

ON avg. there are around 18 x M7.0 - 7.9 events each year, that equals 1 event in that range every 21 days
for M 8.0 and greater 1 per year. Some years see 2 x M8+ events other years there are none


Dave
 
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Astronuc
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davenn
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http://www.stuff.co.nz/world/south-pacific/79430986/vanuatu-hit-by-large-quake

Happened ~30 mins ago, so information still coming in.
Hi Stevie

Yup, the Vanuatu area is keeping its name as a very seismically active region
This latest M 7.0 was onshore in the centre of the Island Archipelago, and this meant that a tsunami was unlikely

The distance from recent large events to the north of this one make it a new separate event rather than an aftershock.

2016-04 Vanuatu Event 2.JPG



cheers
Dave
 
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Connecting the dots, is this a fault line?
 
  • #9
davenn
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Connecting the dots, is this a fault line?
Hi there

not in this case, the events ... main shock and aftershock events are actually showing the direction that the fault line dips at

The main fault line, that is, the plate boundary, is shown by the red line running roughly north - south in the above pic
This region is a subduction zone with seafloor west ( left) of that red line, diving down under the seafloor/land to the east (right) of the line

so in cross-section we see something like this ......
( a very quick and rough drawing) not to scale but will give you the idea :smile:
subduction.GIF


The black dots being the quakes



cheers
Dave
 
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Astronuc
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