Not sure what I can make into equivalent resistors

In summary: If you only want to find the resistance of the circuit with the capacitor in it, you can take the equivalent resistor from the parallel circuit and add it to the resistance of the circuit with the capacitor.
  • #1
egio
14
3
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Could I combine the two resistors together in parallel to make an equivalent resistor, and then use that equivalent resistor in series with the capacitor?

It would be great if there was some rule of thumb that I can use to know what I can make into an equivalent resistor/capacitor down the line once I come across different circuit combinations.

Thanks so much!
 
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  • #2
egio said:
Here is the circuit!

Could I combine the two resistors together in parallel to make an equivalent resistor, and then use that equivalent resistor in series with the capacitor?

It would be great if there was some rule of thumb that I can use to know what I can make into an equivalent resistor/capacitor down the line once I come across different circuit combinations.

Thanks so much!
If I understand your questions correctly, the answer is yes to all of them.
Here is a link about calculating the resistance of a resistors wired in parallel:http://www.electronics-tutorials.ws/resistor/res_4.html
 
  • #3
.Scott said:
If I understand your questions correctly, the answer is yes to all of them.
Here is a link about calculating the resistance of a resistors wired in parallel:http://www.electronics-tutorials.ws/resistor/res_4.html
Ah, I see. So to confirm, I can make an equivalent resistor even though the capacitor is there?

And thanks for the link!
 
  • #4
egio said:
So to confirm, I can make an equivalent resistor even though the capacitor is there?
Yes, as long as the resistors are connected to each other directly.
 
  • #5
.Scott said:
Yes, as long as the resistors are connected to each other directly.
Hmm.. Can you please clarify what you mean by "directly?"
 
  • #6
In order for the resistors to be in parallel, the resistors need to be connected at both ends to the opposite ends of the other resistor(s).

For example, if I have:
* a 10-ohm resistor tied to nodes A and B;
* another 10-ohm resistor tied to nodes A and B; and
* a capacitor tied across nodes A and C (or node A and B).
then those two 10-ohm resistors are equivalent to a single 5-ohm resistor. The same as this:
* a 5-ohm resistor tied to nodes A and B; and
* a capacitor tied across nodes A and C (or node A and B).

On the other hand, if you have this:
* a 10-ohm resistor tied to nodes A and B;
* a 10-ohm resistor tied to nodes A and C; and
* a capacitor tied across nodes B and C
then these resistors are not in parallel and, unless nodes B and C are connected, are not equivalent to 5-ohm (or any other value) resistor.
 
  • #7
egio said:
Hmm.. Can you please clarify what you mean by "directly?"
upload_2017-3-17_9-46-33.png
 
  • #8
.Scott said:
In order for the resistors to be in parallel, the resistors need to be connected at both ends to the opposite ends of the other resistor(s).

For example, if I have:
* a 10-ohm resistor tied to nodes A and B;
* another 10-ohm resistor tied to nodes A and B; and
* a capacitor tied across nodes A and C (or node A and B).
then those two 10-ohm resistors are equivalent to a single 5-ohm resistor. The same as this:
* a 5-ohm resistor tied to nodes A and B; and
* a capacitor tied across nodes A and C (or node A and B).

On the other hand, if you have this:
* a 10-ohm resistor tied to nodes A and B;
* a 10-ohm resistor tied to nodes A and C; and
* a capacitor tied across nodes B and C
then these resistors are not in parallel and, unless nodes B and C are connected, are not equivalent to 5-ohm (or any other value) resistor.
Ah, I see. Thank you for the detailss!
 
  • #9
davenn said:
Are you saying that that is what resistors that are connected directly look like? Because then looking at my circuit, the resistors are not connected directly, since the capacitor is in between the upper node that they share. Is my intuition correct?
 
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  • #10
egio said:
Are you saying that that is what resistors that are connected directly look like? Because then looking at my circuit, the resistors are not connected directly, since the capacitor is in between the upper node that they share. Is my intuition correct?
yes, I am saying my pic is what you should have ... anything else is incorrect for what you described in your OP as what you wanted

Could I combine the two resistors together in parallel to make an equivalent resistor, and then use that equivalent resistor in series with the capacitor?

your image shows that the resistors are NOT in parallel so isn't in line with what you wanted
Dave
 
  • #11
davenn said:
yes, I am saying my pic is what you should have ... anything else is incorrect for what you described in your OP as what you wanted

your image shows that the resistors are NOT in parallel so isn't in line with what you wanted

Dave
Oohh I see... If I wanted to find the resistance of the entire circuit, how would I since I can't combine them into an equivalent resistor?
 
  • #12
egio said:
Oohh I see... If I wanted to find the resistance of the entire circuit, how would I since I can't combine them into an equivalent resistor?

way back in post #2, Scott gave you a link to show you how to calculate parallel resistors

http://www.electronics-tutorials.ws/resistor/res_4.html

you can only measure the combined parallel resistance across the ends of the resistors not from the far side of the capacitor
as it will make the resistance look like an open circuit
 
  • #13
egio said:
Oohh I see... If I wanted to find the resistance of the entire circuit, how would I since I can't combine them into an equivalent resistor?
The Equivalent single resistance in the first diagram will depend upon the value of the C and the operating frequency. Taking two extremes: for DC or very low frequencies, the equivalent resistance is the value of the right hand resistor (the C isolates the left hand R completely) and for very high frequencies (where the C behaves like a short circuit), the equivalent resistor is the same as for the two resistors connected in parallel.
For frequencies in between (i.e. one a large range) you need to consider the Impedance of all three circuit elements.
 

Related to Not sure what I can make into equivalent resistors

What is the purpose of making equivalent resistors?

Making equivalent resistors allows for the creation of a more complex circuit using simpler components. It also helps to evenly distribute the voltage and current throughout the circuit.

What are the steps for making equivalent resistors?

The steps for making equivalent resistors include identifying the desired resistance, finding the individual resistors that will add up to that resistance, and connecting them in either series or parallel configurations.

What is the difference between series and parallel configurations?

In a series configuration, the resistors are connected one after the other, creating a single path for the current to flow through. In a parallel configuration, the resistors are connected side by side, creating multiple paths for the current to flow through.

How do I calculate the equivalent resistance of resistors in series?

To calculate the equivalent resistance of resistors in series, simply add up the values of each resistor. For example, if you have three resistors with values of 10 ohms, 20 ohms, and 30 ohms, the equivalent resistance would be 10 + 20 + 30 = 60 ohms.

How do I calculate the equivalent resistance of resistors in parallel?

To calculate the equivalent resistance of resistors in parallel, use the formula 1/Req = 1/R1 + 1/R2 + 1/R3, where Req is the equivalent resistance and R1, R2, and R3 are the values of the individual resistors. Once you have the sum, take the reciprocal to find the equivalent resistance.

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